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Discussion Starter #1
What is the best gear oil for use in a 97 ITR?

I used Amsoil recently. A week later I gritted 3 and 4 on the way back from the track. When I got home an hour later I was unable to select reverse.
After 15 mintes of try I was then able to select reverse but abrely. The reverse lights were not even triggered and the shifter seemed likely to slip back into neutral.

The car seems almost back to normal now (3 weeks later). Should I have tried genuine Honda gear oil? What is your recommendation?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
PLease offer other options. Next best etc. and why.

Also, what grade is best? What si recommended by
honda and under what circumstances should I consifer another?
 

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In the article Ross used Redline, I prefer Genuine Honda fluid. I'm not sure what the grade of it is, but you really can't go wrong with what comes from the factory.

Some people substitute a quart for the GM syncromesh. If you want you can do a search on it for more info. I myself have never used it but my tranny shifts like a hot knife through butter.
 

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you don't use gear oil on a stock ITR Torsen. You use MTF (click last month's discussion on this). GL5 gear oil is for clutch pack LSD's or consistently high operating temp (racing)diffs.

your problem is that you run the car as a daily driver and you also take it to the track.: 2 different operating temperature requirements. The track adds higher heat and so a synthetic GL5 works great but when you cool down for daily driving, the full synthetic falls out of it's best temperature range and becomes too slippery for the synchros.

I suggest you go to a synthetic MTF and either add a friction modifier or go 3/4 MTF and 1/4 Honda MTF.

Start there. If the car doesn't bite during daily driving afterwards, try half and half.

Those are 2 options. You'll have to play around to see what works for you because I can't predict how you lap on your track or load it. You may want to call Redline or Amsoil and ask them out of the 2 choices which one they think is better.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, maybe I should point out that the car now feels fine daily. It only grits when shifting at high rpms.

Another important fact: I am in Jamaica. The climate here is consistently warm as you may know (85-95F) average most of the year.

Also, what is the difference (if any) between gear oil for LSD vs non LSD trannies.
 

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Tazmanian on Feb/08/04 said:
OK, maybe I should point out that the car now feels fine daily. It only grits when shifting at high rpms.

Another important fact: I am in Jamaica. The climate here is consistently warm as you may know (85-95F) average most of the year.

Also, what is the difference (if any) between gear oil for LSD vs non LSD trannies.

change it. how long has it been in there?

Quote: from http://www.redlineoil.com/products.htm
Red Line MTL may be used in transmissions which recommend 70W, 75W, 80W, or 85W GL-4 gear oils, or SAE 30 or 5W/10W30 motor oils.

If a 90W GL-4 or SAE 40, 10W40, or 15W40 is required, MT-90 may be used.

If the transmission or transaxle requires an SAE 90 GL-5 gear oil, then Red Line 75W90NS or 75W140NS Gear Oil may be used.

It is not necessary to flush the transmission before replacing with MTL. Remove the drain plug and drain while warm.

Seal compatibility has been designed to be similar to petroleum lubricants, and leakage should be no greater than any other oil of comparable viscosity.

Being formulated with extremely stable synthetic basestocks, MTL and MT-90 will last much longer than conventional petroleum lubricants. However, we do not recommend extended drain intervals, since without a filtration system, there is no way to remove metal shavings other than draining the lubricant.
MTF are GL-4 rated without friction modifiers

Gear oil for clutch packs are usually GL-5 rated and will have friction modifiers.

If you use Gear oil in a non-LSD diff, be aware that it has these modifiers that bite harder for the LSD cars.

If your car is highly loaded under racing and run high temp. then a gear oil may be an option but I haven't seen that happen in an HPDE ITR with a stock LSD. The stock street ITR LSD doesn't call for 40 or 90 or 140 weight oil. Honda asks that you use the equivalent of a 30 weight oil.

You may feel after seeing how the oil performs on the track that you need a 40 weight but then you run into problems when it's cooler (even in Jamaica, street temps are nowhere near race temps in a diff).



You can run shock proof lightweight gear oil instead but realize that this is too slippery for the street.

As I said you probably want to run MTF unless you're Pierre Kleinubing .
 

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IGUEZ2K4 on Feb/03/04 said:
one word, two syllables, a butt load of difference: REDLINE
I've heard too many horror stories of Redline used in ITR trannies over at honda-tech. Read up before you put it in your car. I'm sticking with Honda fluid from now on...
 

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there are equal numbers of horror stories and positive responses to Redline over at h-t. It can get pretty confusing.

You have to put each one in context as I stated in the thread I linked here or else you'll walk away with the wrong conclusion.

Choose the oil that you need for the conditions you place the diff under (get a feel for the operating temp. range for each oil : MTL, MT-90, 75W90 gear oil) and change it regularly...don't push your diff change schedule interval (especially if you track it): it doesn't have a filter and any crap that gets into your synchros because you went too long just compounds your problems (or the ones these people report at h-t).

you may have to add a friction modifier or change the proportion of syntheric and Honda MTF for your needs.

This applies to Amsoil and Motul as well...it's not a Redline only phenomenon.

If your car is a street car there's no reason to go to MT90. And if the MTL slips, add a capful or 2 of friction modifier...you have to play with it to get the right combination for your street/track combination needs. Honda MTF can fail on a track.

You see track people reporting problems with GM Synchromesh now too...it's because Synchromesh is not a track temp. shockproof oil...use the right oil for the intended purpose!!!

PS here's the analogy : It's like someone putting in 20W50 into a winter snowbelt motor and complaining that the oil sucks....
 

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Yep, I understand what you're saying MD. I don't plan on tracking my ride for at least another year so Honda MTF is for me. =)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Firstly I had no idea what the recommended weight for oil is for a Honda gearbox.In fact, I used Amsoil (75-90) in a Civic SiR I also drive. The gearbox gets stiffer (harder t shift) the longer you drive. It kills me. Any suggestions?


As for MTF vs Gear. Silly me. I didnt know that there was a difference. I thought there was ATF and gear oil for auto and manual. Thanks for the info, you live and learn.

What grade is Honda MTF, anyway?

I think I will stick to the Honda MTF stuff. Thanks guys.
 
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