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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2000 LS with 60k miles on it. since I've heard nothing but good stuff about Seafaom, I decided to try it out.

I poured some through the brake booster line and the car immediately died. since there was still some Seafoam in the funnel, I started up the car again to suck it in. after this little bit was sucked in I added a slight bit more and the same thing happened. I procedded to start the car and let it run till it was gone, then I shut it off. I then poured the rest of the can (1/2-2/3 of it) into the crank case. after waiting 10 minutes I started up the car and watched the smoke fly as I reved it up for a minute or two. when I was done I looked down and noticed that the CEL was on. I drove over to an Autozone (8 miles) to have the code looked at and the results were: cylinders 1,2, and 4 misfire along with random misfire. I pulled the brand new Bosch Platinums that I had bought this morning to use for the Seafoam and save the Densos. the tips had a little bit of a rainbow effect going on.

in the fall the car recieved a valve adjustment, new distributor cap, rotor, NGK blue plug wires and Denso Platinum plugs. when I pulled the Denso plugs this morning the tips were a lightish charcoal gray. I don't know if this is a good thing or not. also, one other thing to make note of: occasionally when I start the car it will have a really rough idle, the rpms will rise and fall a little bit, then it will stall. I have yet to find the source of this problem as well. whenever I bring it to the stealership the problem magically goes away.

I don't know where to even start looking for problems... any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks!
 

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I dont think youre supposed to use the whole bottle... You may have hydrolocked? I dont know much about it though, but that seemed to be pretty much the only warning here on the boards, dont use too much or youll hydrolock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I only used 1/3-1/2 of it through the vacuum line. if the car hydrolocked, wouldn't it not run at all? the Seafoam is combustable, so even if I did pour too much in it would still combust, even though it'd take a little longer... could it have caused severe detonation? I'm still at a loss with what to do.

I'm tempted to try resetting the ecu to see if it'll clear the code. the misfire isn't very bad at all (an occasional backfire). the car had a little bit of a rough idle before, so I didn't think anything of it.
 

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Have you checked your break booster line to make sure it's tight/no vac leaks? How long ago did you put the sea foam in? when you went to autozone, did you jump on it? or gimp it? on my buddy's car, he had similar symptoms that went away after he made a nice WOT run down the highway.
 

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victoly on Apr/17/04 said:
I dont think youre supposed to use the whole bottle... You may have hydrolocked? I dont know much about it though, but that seemed to be pretty much the only warning here on the boards, dont use too much or youll hydrolock.
Why do people talk if they have no clue what they are talking about??
 

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Shadowhunter on Apr/17/04 said:
It sounds like to me that the o2 Sensor(s) is gone.
he could have very well easily fouled his 02 sensor.

take the sensor out and see what is on it..if it is fouled out get a new one and see if that works..

other than that i would have no clue why the random misfires happen
 

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Shadowhunter on Apr/17/04 said:
It sounds like to me that the o2 Sensor(s) is gone.
Didn't even think about that. I know it fouls your plugs, but since you changed em....but the O2 sensor is probably fouled too. Have you tried Doing a WOT Run? somebody correct me if i'm wrong, but when at WOT the ECU doesn't use the o2 at all....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well, when I took out the cheap plugs that I bought for today they didn't look bad at all. when I drove to Autozone I didn't drive WOT, but I wasn't a ***** with the throttle by any stretch of the imagination. I actually haven't started up the car yet with the old plugs yet. since Autozone I've been changing my tranny fluid and oil with a break for dinner and I didn't want to start the car inbetween that.

I poured the Seafoam into a funnel then watched it slowly drain. I definately think that's where I screwed something up.

there's a good chance that I could have screwed over the O2 sensor, but there's a few things that make me think I didn't. first: the misfires only occur in three of the four cylinders. if it was the O2 sensor I'd think it'd occur in all four. second: for whatever it's worth, the can of Seafoam did say that it was safe for the O2 sensor, although I was a moron and didn't pour it in slowly, so it's possible.

I'm going out to get a movie in a little bit after I finish the oil. I'll let it work itself in for a little while then I'll try an WOT run. believe it or not, the car actually did feel a little bit smoother while some smoke was still working it's way out

I'll check the O2 sensors while the car is jacked up for the oil. what in particular should I look for on them, and if they are bad, about how much would a new one set me back? also, correct me if I'm wrong, but I have three that I should be checking since my car is a 2000, right? (one on the header, beginning of cat, and end of cat) I didn't do any of the exhaust work on the car myself and I've never payed attention to them.

thanks a lot for the suggestions guys. without you I'd be totally lost.

oh, and the vacuum line looks fine. no pinches that I can see.
 

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xtremeness101 on Apr/17/04 said:
Quote: victoly on Apr/17/04I dont think youre supposed to use the whole bottle... You may have hydrolocked? I dont know much about it though, but that seemed to be pretty much the only warning here on the boards, dont use too much or youll hydrolock. Why do people talk if they have no clue what they are talking about??
Its called making a suggestion, admittedly, i didnt know much about it so i said all that i did know. Why do people talk if theyre just gonna be a negative ****ass, take it somewhere else.
 

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duranged on Apr/17/04 said:
I poured the Seafoam into a funnel then watched it slowly drain. I definately think that's where I screwed something up.
You were suppose to start the car first and slowly let in the seaform in little by little. Not fill the whole tube and watch it slowly drain... OMG. Hope you didnt hydrolock the sh*t...
 

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Ok, the purpose of the seafoam is to aid in clean up of carbon build-up throughout your engine and injectors. Sometimes it can exibit misfiring while introducing these cleaners into the engine. I would not worry too much about the random misfire codes as long as they do not continue to restore themselves in memory after you clear them. Just to be safe I would recommend replacing your spark plugs. I really think you just need to go out and take it for a good drive and do some full throttle runs just to clear out some of the crud that could have been left behind. I don't think you took out your 02 sensor that quickly, I've used many different products and not once have I come across an 02 sensor failure. But I quess anything is possible
 

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Does anyone know what the term "hydrolock" actually means?
 

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JustinKlemgold on Apr/17/04 said:
Does anyone know what the term "hydrolock" actually means?

Let me know if this is fairly acurate, mods: feel free to edit

Quote: From Prepsparkplug.com about hydrolock


Hydrostatic lock, hydraulic lock or hydrolock occurs when liquids, typically water, enter an engine cylinder. This can occur from a coolant, oil or fuel leak, but the chief cause is drawing water into the engine through the air induction system (airbox & filter, ducting, throttle body or carburetor, intake manifold). Internal combustion engines (spark or compression ignition) operating on a two-stroke or four-stroke cycle must employ a compression stroke to compress the charge (usually an air/fuel mixture). Liquids are incompressible; the presence of a liquid in the engine cylinder during the compression stroke generates destructively high cylinder pressures.

Abnormally high cylinder pressures can bend and break pistons, piston pins, connecting rods, crankshafts and ruin bearings and can crack or break cylinder heads and engine blocks. Small amounts of liquids may pass through an engine cycle without damage, but volumes exceeding 40cc (1.4 fluid ounces, <3 tablespoons) will cause many engines to develop cylinder pressures well in excess of 1000psi. A larger volume of water, up to the combustion chamber volume (usually 60cc to 100cc), will generate increasingly high cylinder pressure during the completion of the compression stroke. Volumes of water which exceed the combustion chamber volume will "stop" a running engine through true hydrostatic lock. Something expensive always bends or breaks when this happens.

Hydrolock may occur while the engine is running, the work of the compression stroke being supplied by engine's rotational inertia. Or a liquid may leak into the cylinder while the engine is being stored; the work of the compression stroke will be supplied by the starter motor.

Hydrolock is not a new problem, but it only affected certain applications. Older American made cars, particularly with V-configuration engines, often employed an air intake location which was high in the engine compartment. Because of the reduced tendency of these older American cars to hydrolock, it has not been in the forefront of design consideration and is not a household term.

Most newer, fuel injected cars have the air intake located low in the engine compartment. The objective of this low air intake is to draw cool air into the engine. Unfortunately, when driving through sufficiently deep standing or splashing water, engine vacuum from the intake stroke will suck water into the engine, particularly if the intake is submerged.

The cost to repair hydrolock damage begins at about $1000.00, and only goes sky high from there. Repair bills in excess of $35,000 have been reported in high-end passenger cars. Racing engines can cost twice that amount. Many new cars have been recognized as having poor designs to prevent hydrolock. Even some Four-Wheel-Drive pickup trucks and SUV's have been identified as having particularly high incidence rates of hydrolock. Manufacturers' warranties do not cover hydrolock engine damage, stating that the cause of operator error. one SUV manufacturer states the maximum vehicle speed through standing water to be 5 mph; hydrolock occurring at speeds in excess of 5 mph is judged to be operator error. The repair may be covered by a vehicle's Collision/Comprehensive insurance.
 

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Yes....hydrolock means it's over...there's no "bad or lump idle", it's done...kaputt....over...finished...
 

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"hydrolock" short for hydrostatic lock. think of it this way, a liquid cannot be compressed. if you introduce fluid/liquid into the cylinder the pressures can become extremely high. when cylinder pressures are beyond the thresholds things will break.

*edit* beat me to it guess i gave the summarized version, lol
 

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dammit...this is why I say don't use the damn funnel sorry acurarider it's just not the right way to do it....

the second mistake was starting the car after the first load of seafoam stalled the engine...you should have poured it back in the bottle. So people I beg you

follow this article and you don't have to worry about hydrolock and you never want to use more then 1/2 the bottle...no more...sorry for the rant I just don't approve of the "funnel" method at all to much crap can happen...let the engine do the pulling through the vacuum...oh well enough with the rant
 

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I have heard that it will finish off a failing Cat though.

I have also heard of guys putting it in a spray bottle and running the engine with the intake off and spraying it into the throttle body.
 
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