Team Integra Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im basically building my car for the track. Im currently on tein s-tech springs and koni yellows. the ride is great and the cars handles really nice, but my car is a bit too low, and I want to raise it up. Im not sure what kind of springs to get next. any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
For a real track racing setup, I strongly recommend a full coilover setup such as Tein Flex, Omni Power, D2..

I used Omni power street setup on my DC2 with 22mm rear sway bar. Incredible handling, simply unbelievable. All my friends are honda geeks with boosted B series motors and never seen a honda handle like mine.

edit: I'll list some reasons for upgrading to a full coilover setup:

The spring rates are matched with the shock dampening levels for optimum performance.

The spring will always remain seated even when the car is jacked up or under extreme racing conditions maybe you will hit the corner of the track and the car will get air born at a wheel..The spring will always be seated or "pre-loaded".

You will never bottom out the shock no matter how low you adjust your ride height. Your shock will always perform its full stroke length.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
i have heard good things about buddy club coilovers as well.. best bet is to check out and get feed back cause u will get different views from people to people\. and if u know or find anyone with the coilover setup on there teg and they live in ur area ask them if they wanna meet upa and ask them for a drive so u can feel how it is. i mean in the terms of sitting in the passanger side. if u knmow the guy well and he lets u drive it to get the handle then hey its a bonus...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,384 Posts
you've got the koni yellows, now just pair them up with ground control coilovers. Killer setup. The OTS koni's are vavled for about 600lb springs max. You can order the GC with whatever spring rate you want. Don't like the ride or handeling? no big deal, a set of springs is only $100. Better than thowing down big $$$ for another set of coilovers if you don't like them.

I use koni yellows with 600lb rear/500lb front. Pretty harsh (rides like my lifted Tacoma) but absolutly beautiful on track. Koni's are american made and can be revalved/shotened to your needs. If you really want an awsome track setup, you can get the relativly new Koni race shocks with the SPSS3 valving good for 1000lb spring rates.

DMS shocks are also a good choice, but I have no experience personally with them. But my friends who race Honda Challenge swear by them.

BTW, this is what I have learned from my friends who race honda challege and what they use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,087 Posts
even in my neck of the Honda woods, we swear on GC + Yellow's as the best bang for the buck as well

up to you man on what springs you personally want, GL

~P2P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,538 Posts
I am looking at the same setup but have a few questions too.

When looking at a koni/gc setup what is the typical offset you want from front to back for your springs?

Also there has to be a downside to valving your shocks too high or else they would comethat way or everyone else would do it. For example on a 600rear 500front setup what would be ideal for shocks?

I also read/herd that it is nice to order your sprints an inch longer....? (I assume so that it is preloaded or something and doesnt unseat itself...?) Thanks for the tips!

Edit:
I am doing a K24 swap into my 98LS which will be my daily driver/occasional track car. The K motor is just slightly heavier than the bseries but does have much worse ground clearance. I was thinking a fairly stiff spring rate in front would help from scrapping and bottoming out. Do you guys have any recommendations for something like this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
actually I was going to get omni power coilover sleeves. front 448lb/rear 338lbs for springs rates. thats pretty decent without sacraficing too much ride quality. plus they're cheaper than ground controls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,087 Posts
how about your anti-roll bars? You can use those instead of having to rely on manipulating your springs for handling. If you can obtain less roll stiffness with the bars, you don't have to go with an awful high spring frequency. They are nice to be high, but you are sacrificing the ride comfort and the springs capability to absorb rough surfaces.. unless you got some nice shocks (=

~P2P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,087 Posts
hey Neil, sorry I missed your post somehow (btw, I marked your topic about the swap, I love watching it, it's like a discussion between 2 rhetoricians =p)

Go here to see what happens if you don't complement them properly

if you went to my link redirect above, you will see how the springs work alongside with the shocks.. When you say valving too high, it actually is generally said too light or too heavy. High (or lack of) usually talks about the resistance-to-moving correlation of the energy (kinetic) through the shock.

You are right about the downside; if it is too light, the ''shock'' received that is transmitted as kinetic energy through this suspension components system will in turn allow the wheel to continue moving upward, thus the tires become unloaded at a given instance as the unsprung weight is moving upward from a ''road shock.'' Too heavy, and the resistance-to-moving correlation is too high and the kinetic energy is then transferred to the body, or chassis. Please keep in mind, this is when you hit an irregularity in the road surface for the compression damping of a shock.

For the rebound damping it's a little different. Often we don't talk about it being too light, but if it's way too heavy, the resistance-to-moving correlation of the shock is, again, high, making the wheel not return to its previous state [effectively.] If you are successful in overloading a tire, the car's weight will bottom out the suspension.

Since you have given a spring rate, you can actually have shocks tailored to them. To do so (you can check out our sponsor that does Koni rebuilds) people use what is called a damper dynanometer (often referred to as a shock absorber dynanometer as well.)

''...performance is measured as the resistive force that the shock exerts when the dyno tries to compress it. Since shock stiffness is proportional to the rate at which the shock is compressed, then the shock dyno measures the shock resistance for different speeds.''

''...the performance of a shock is different depending on whether the shock is being compressed or extended. Thus the shock dyno measures the resistive force offered by a shock when it is both compressed and extended at various rates (velocities).''

''The data from a shock dyno is plotted as a pair of curves. one curve for compression and one for rebound. The curves represent resistive force VS shock velocity.''

''However, to differentiate the curves for compression and rebound, one is plotted with resistive force in the positive y-direction and the other is plotted with resistive force in the negative y-direction.''


~P2P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
RacerZook on Feb/07/06 said:
you've got the koni yellows, now just pair them up with ground control coilovers. Killer setup. The OTS koni's are vavled for about 600lb springs max. You can order the GC with whatever spring rate you want. Don't like the ride or handeling? no big deal, a set of springs is only $100. Better than thowing down big $$$ for another set of coilovers if you don't like them.

I use koni yellows with 600lb rear/500lb front. Pretty harsh (rides like my lifted Tacoma) but absolutly beautiful on track. Koni's are american made and can be revalved/shotened to your needs. If you really want an awsome track setup, you can get the relativly new Koni race shocks with the SPSS3 valving good for 1000lb spring rates.

DMS shocks are also a good choice, but I have no experience personally with them. But my friends who race Honda Challenge swear by them.

BTW, this is what I have learned from my friends who race honda challege and what they use.
where can I get em revalved? what do you think about omni power coilovers with my koni yellows?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,087 Posts
xjdkle on Feb/08/06 said:
Quote: RacerZook on Feb/07/06you've got the koni yellows, now just pair them up with ground control coilovers. Killer setup. The OTS koni's are vavled for about 600lb springs max. You can order the GC with whatever spring rate you want. Don't like the ride or handeling? no big deal, a set of springs is only $100. Better than thowing down big $$$ for another set of coilovers if you don't like them.
I use koni yellows with 600lb rear/500lb front. Pretty harsh (rides like my lifted Tacoma) but absolutly beautiful on track. Koni's are american made and can be revalved/shotened to your needs. If you really want an awsome track setup, you can get the relativly new Koni race shocks with the SPSS3 valving good for 1000lb spring rates.

DMS shocks are also a good choice, but I have no experience personally with them. But my friends who race Honda Challenge swear by them.

BTW, this is what I have learned from my friends who race honda challege and what they use.


where can I get em revalved? what do you think about omni power coilovers with my koni yellows?

Check out our sponsor..

~P2P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,538 Posts
Thanks for the great info man. Have any spring rate suggestions? I was thinkin that actually the off the shelf koni & gc coilovers with their standard spring rates would be a good choice but I'm not expert in that field.

Glad you enjoy MD and I going back and forth lol.

tiger6386 on Feb/08/06 said:
hey Neil, sorry I missed your post somehow (btw, I marked your topic about the swap, I love watching it, it's like a discussion between 2 rhetoricians =p)

Go here to see what happens if you don't complement them properly

if you went to my link redirect above, you will see how the springs work alongside with the shocks.. When you say valving too high, it actually is generally said too light or too heavy. High (or lack of) usually talks about the resistance-to-moving correlation of the energy (kinetic) through the shock.

You are right about the downside; if it is too light, the ''shock'' received that is transmitted as kinetic energy through this suspension components system will in turn allow the wheel to continue moving upward, thus the tires become unloaded at a given instance as the unsprung weight is moving upward from a ''road shock.'' Too heavy, and the resistance-to-moving correlation is too high and the kinetic energy is then transferred to the body, or chassis. Please keep in mind, this is when you hit an irregularity in the road surface for the compression damping of a shock.

For the rebound damping it's a little different. Often we don't talk about it being too light, but if it's way too heavy, the resistance-to-moving correlation of the shock is, again, high, making the wheel not return to its previous state [effectively.] If you are successful in overloading a tire, the car's weight will bottom out the suspension.

Since you have given a spring rate, you can actually have shocks tailored to them. To do so (you can check out our sponsor that does Koni rebuilds) people use what is called a damper dynanometer (often referred to as a shock absorber dynanometer as well.)

''...performance is measured as the resistive force that the shock exerts when the dyno tries to compress it. Since shock stiffness is proportional to the rate at which the shock is compressed, then the shock dyno measures the shock resistance for different speeds.''

''...the performance of a shock is different depending on whether the shock is being compressed or extended. Thus the shock dyno measures the resistive force offered by a shock when it is both compressed and extended at various rates (velocities).''

''The data from a shock dyno is plotted as a pair of curves. one curve for compression and one for rebound. The curves represent resistive force VS shock velocity.''

''However, to differentiate the curves for compression and rebound, one is plotted with resistive force in the positive y-direction and the other is plotted with resistive force in the negative y-direction.''

~P2P
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top