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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to be slotting my own blank rotors in an attempt to produce my own slotted rotors. I know and understnad the theory behind the purpose of slotting a rotor, but I don't fully understand the theories behind the different patterns performed by different rotor manufacturers. I was wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction or does anyone here have any knowledge or insight.
 

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i don't think that is very wise to be slotting your own rotors that didn't come factory like that...but its your car.

to answer your question...the pattern is all about getting the gases away from the pads. thats why all slotted rotors have the slot's rotor edge going into the pad and the center edge coming out last.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
why don't you recommend slotting them, I have access to a full machine shop and a CNC machine. How do you think the companies apply slots to their rotors.

And thanks for the help
 

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I think if the metal of the solid rotor is designed to be left solid and the you cut the slots into them it could compromise the structural integrity of the rotor. If you really want slotted rotors just get a set that already come slotted. They aren't much money
 

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The big difference is in how they are forged. Cutting slots into a piece of metal creates unnatural stress points. If they are forged that way, those stress points don't exist.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I understand everything that everyone has said. I am doing this as an experiment and just want to see if I can do it. I like to do little projects myself. Cutting a slot into a solid piece of steel does create unnatural stress points, but how do you think aftermarket companies create their rotors. The rotors are not forged with slots, the slots are cut afterwards. The carefulness is all about how you cut the slots, the depth of the cut and the length of the cut across the rotor.

Oh and one more thing, I didn't ask for people to criticize me on my choice, I asked for information on the theory behind the different patterns out on the market currently. I didn't ask you to cut your rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
dvcooke on Aug/20/02 said:
The big difference is in how they are forged. Cutting slots into a piece of metal creates unnatural stress points. If they are forged that way, those stress points don't exist.
Low stress points can be made through careful and proper cutting. Most of the time the stress points occur because of how the original cut was made. If there are tiny cracks these can cause what is called crack propagation which leads to premature fratigue and fracture. The small cracks represent voids along the grain boundaries, thus not allow the grains to push up against each other and hold each other in place. I can go on...
 

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please do..
 

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It's true most aftermarket companies slot the rotors after they've been forged. They do not actually forge the rotors with the slot pattern.

I don't believe there is much to discuss on slot patterns. Slots always go in the direction so that gasses get swept away to the outside of the rotor as it moves across the pad. The differences mainly would be the size of the slot and slot angle. Some rotors have slots that are sort of curved rather than straight but I don't really see the advantage in that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
LT6916 on Aug/20/02 said:
please do..
what else would you like to know... it is hard to just ramble on about this. I took that class 1.5 years ago so some of it has faded from my memory.

when looking at a piece of metal at a microscopic level there are actually different groups of grains, the grain boundary is what separates the grains fom one another. Each grain has proper orientation within its own grain boundary, but the different grains are not necessarily oriented properly. Hope that makes sense. As stress is added to the metal the grains push on each other or pull away from each other. The denser and less obstructed the grains are the less movement they are allowed. This is way different metals hold different tensile and compressive strengths. These properities are based on the compostion of the metal (for example some steels possess more carbon than other, while other materials can consists of other metals) The carbon content is a major factor in steel properties such as hardness, ductility, and strength. The strength properties also have a lot to do with the way the metal is created. I can't get into much detail here because my memory is alittle faded and i don't want to give incorrect information. But the basics depend on the amount of heat, the length of time metal is held at that heat. All this plays an important role into the compostion and type of grains present. Now i'm reaching the end of my memory. Specific questions would be esaier to answer
 

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I still would buy pre slotted rotors rather than run the risk of possibley braking a stock slotted rotor and that could cause lots of damage
 

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Going OT here, but born2speed has kind of made a point here. This is a great board, but it has an over-abundance of what I would call "free advice". All to often someone that is asking a question knowing damn well what they are getting themselves into gets alot of advice they dont need about why they shouldnt do something, or do it differently without ever actually having their questions answered. Of course if someone is clearly misguided, then by all means, help em out. But if it is someone like born2speed who knows exactly what they are getting themselves into, obviously has the background knowledge and the right tools to be doing this, and is willing to take the risk, they could probably do without extra rhetoric. Anyway, just my 2 cents.
 

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born2speed, i commend you on your experiment. i love seeing someone try to make something work and really get into it rather than just taking their car to a "speed shop" and just having "stuff" put on their car.

we need more people like this.

as far as slotted rotors go, you sound like you already know what to do. my advise...no full cuts and use plenty of cutting fluid.

BTW - what kind of blanks are you using?
 

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SleeperTeg on Aug/21/02 said:
born2speed, i commend you on your experiment. i love seeing someone try to make something work and really get into it rather than just taking their car to a "speed shop" and just having "stuff" put on their car.

we need more people like this.

as far as slotted rotors go, you sound like you already know what to do. my advise...no full cuts and use plenty of cutting fluid.

BTW - what kind of blanks are you using?
I agree ... and I figure he's using whatever blanks came with his AEM big brakes kit. (Yeah, I checked his profile.)

And born2 - please post some pics of your finished slotted rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you br1t1shguy and SleeperTeg. It is all very true about some of the responses that are posted on this board and many other boards. There is a great feeling of accomplishment when you do something completely yourself and show yourself that you can do it and don't need to rely on someone else. I started my car like that and now I realize that I wasted a great deal of money and missed out on many opportunities to learn for myself.

I am using type-R 11 in. rotors redrilled for a 4 lug. They are produced by brembo and are the ones you recieve from fastbrakes.com in their SpecR kit.

SleeperTeg, By full cuts do you mean not to make the cut in one pass (I plan on doing multiply passes, probably cutting about 10% of the total depth each time.)
 

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granted it's great that you want to do this as a learning experience and such.

however, you mentioned earlier that it depends on the brake's metal composition. More carbon is better i take it? do you know the composition of these brembo type-r rotors? I'm not saying do this, but call up Brembo Company and just ask them if your rotors can be slotted 10% without compromising the rotor's integrity for hard, long braking.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
LT6916 on Aug/24/02 said:
granted it's great that you want to do this as a learning experience and such.

however, you mentioned earlier that it depends on the brake's metal composition. More carbon is better i take it? do you know the composition of these brembo type-r rotors? I'm not saying do this, but call up Brembo Company and just ask them if your rotors can be slotted 10% without compromising the rotor's integrity for hard, long braking.
hey man that is a great idea. I didn't even think of doing that. I guess I was too caught up in excitment that I was actually gonna do it and was approaching it from a limited view. Thanks again
 

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im not 100% positive here but i thought brembo didnt slot their rotors. they only drilled em. anyone else know if that true or not?
 

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nope they do both and usually slot and drill all their rotors.
 
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