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Should I rebuild the engine?

  • Yes

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  • No, waste of money

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  • No, more harm than good

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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey y'all,

So the B18 will be getting forged pistons and rods for a turbo setup. Since the engine will be out of the car and stripped down would you recommend that I rebuild it at the same time?
I would use one of those $300 OEM kits with the gaskets and all that, as well as some ARP bolts.

I know that some people have said rebuilds aren't always a great idea because the engine may have been stronger with the old original parts than your half-assed rebuild job. I know it's important to know what mileage the engine has, but I haven't bought the car yet and they're pretty hard to find near me so I would estimate 150k+. I won't buy anything that doesn't look well taken care of/run/drive. So, assuming the job was done properly would it be opening a can of worms, or a waste of time/money, or would it be a good time to replace all of that?
Also, should I replace the rod bearings as a part of said rebuild or reuse them?

Thank you!
 

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I guess I'm confused on what you think the difference is between replacing rods & pistons, vs. performing a "rebuild". You need to strip the motor down completely to replace rods & pistons. You can't reuse gaskets. That leaves rod & crank bearings. Replacing rods & pistons is basically a "rebuild".

Yes, I would replace them. All other components are getting replaced, and it wouldn't make sense to not replace rod & crank bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I guess I'm confused on what you think the difference is between replacing rods & pistons, vs. performing a "rebuild". You need to strip the motor down completely to replace rods & pistons. You can't reuse gaskets. That leaves rod & crank bearings. Replacing rods & pistons is basically a "rebuild".

Yes, I would replace them. All other components are getting replaced, and it wouldn't make sense to not replace rod & crank bearings.
That's what I thought. I've never done a rebuild before so I wasn't sure if replacing rods and pistons would require messing with all the gaskets but that makes sense (y)

One other question, I've seen that sometimes older blocks need an oversized piston because the cylinders expand, would it be smart to take the engine apart before I buy pistons to see or should I just anticipate putting .5mm oversized ones in?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Stock size will be fine. You don’t want oversized pistons unless there’s a flaw with one of the cylinders. Oversized pistons requires the cylinder to be bored, which minimizes the cylinder wall thickness. Not a food thing for forced induction. Unless of course you plan on sleeving the block.
Thank you, that's very helpful.

Love your build thread btw, that's a crazy amount of power. People always say anything over 300 is too much to handle on these cars 😂 How do you get all that power to the ground? Is it mostly in the suspension/tires or do you run one of those Hondata traction control modules?
 

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Hey y'all,

So the B18 will be getting forged pistons and rods for a turbo setup. Since the engine will be out of the car and stripped down would you recommend that I rebuild it at the same time?
I would use one of those $300 OEM kits with the gaskets and all that, as well as some ARP bolts.

I know that some people have said rebuilds aren't always a great idea because the engine may have been stronger with the old original parts than your half-assed rebuild job. I know it's important to know what mileage the engine has, but I haven't bought the car yet and they're pretty hard to find near me so I would estimate 150k+. I won't buy anything that doesn't look well taken care of/run/drive. So, assuming the job was done properly would it be opening a can of worms, or a waste of time/money, or would it be a good time to replace all of that?
Also, should I replace the rod bearings as a part of said rebuild or reuse them?

Thank you!
Yeah replace them all in
 

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One other question, I've seen that sometimes older blocks need an oversized piston because the cylinders expand, would it be smart to take the engine apart before I buy pistons to see or should I just anticipate putting .5mm oversized ones in?
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These engines are cast iron(hard) factory sleeves. They don't really fatigue over time because the pistons are aluminum(soft). Unless you have had a catastrophic failure. More than likely you will still see the crosshatches on the cylinder walls if engine was well maintained. But, If you don't have the proper tooling to measure things correctly. Take it down to local machine shop and have them measure things out for you. It will not cost much and you will have peace of mind. Tools needed (good set of micrometers, boremeter, flatedge(straight bar), calipers, plastigauge, maybe somethings I'm missing). Mostlikey if your engine runs good now, you won't have problems rebuilding. But, peace of mind. Some good tricks, when pulling the engine apart go in reverse sequence to tightening and back off slowly to avoid warpage on cylinder head, cam hold downs, etc. Also, I prefer to measure journals, bearing thickness, bore holes and using basic math to get tolerances and then also plastigauge for reassurance. I've built about 20 b-series engines with no issues. But these rules of thumb/ guide lines are basic standards to building any Internal Combustion Engine.
Good luck!
 

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I've never seen a B18 block with over 150k that didn't need to be bored and Honed. When you disassemble the motor, you take the block, crank, head and rods to a machine shop for measuring. Then they will recommend any resizing you may need. And the block and head must be resurfaced. Everytime.

On top of all that work, main bearings, rod bearings and all seals & gaskets must be replaced for a full & correct rebuild.

When you bore over and hone, this makes the cylinder bores factory fresh. Making the rebuild last much longer. It's more expensive to do things this way. But it's better than spending half the money and finding out later that something is out of spec causing a noise or smoke out of the exhaust.
 
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