Team Integra Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a day of driving I felt the ride was kinda "soft" feeling. I decided to bring the tire pressure from 32 front, 30 rear to 35psi all four corners. Since I have done this I have lost damn near 100kms of gas milage per tank, I'll be lucky to make 350kms(217miles) this tank and I usually get 425kms(264miles) or so. I have recently given the car a tuneup but the milage was only affected after the tire pressure change which was at least 2 weeks after the tune up. Is a change like this capable of reducing gas milage? This is all city driving, the car is a 1997 GSR, it is stock. The tune up mensioned replaced all parts common of a tune up.

I searched, found nothing like this. If you find something, good for you, you just spent entirely too much time looking to prove someone wrong on the internet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,995 Posts
if you increase pressure you generally get better mileage.I don't know what to tell you. But you should really stick to your recommended amount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
recommended amount on tire side wall is 35psi....

i'm running 205/50/R15, should I stick to the factory tire pressure for the car, or the pressure recommended by the tire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,097 Posts
Whatever works best for you really, it's not a big deal. Actual pressure varies when driving anyway, so the "base" pressure that works for you is best, within a reasonable range of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
i have 205/40/17 low profile tires, should i put 35 psi in all tires? I heard that you put less air during summer like 32psi cuz they get hotter, and put 35 psi in winter cuz its cold already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
My tires say max press. 44 lbs. I pump mine up to 40 lbs and i got 50km more mileage.

I dont knwop whats with yoru car. I get 500 kms per tank

about 300 miles.

and I have a stock GSR with only filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
uhh physics would prove that more air in the tire would cause LESS friction on the read, hence less tire touching the road and greater MPG.

with less air, more of the tire will touch causing more friction and a decrease in MPG.

and yes in summer, tire gets hotter causing the air to expand and give a greater PSI when running the car around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,276 Posts
For those of you who can't picture it, imagine having a party balloon barely filled with air. Try rolling it on the counter. Now fill the balloon up with a lot more air, and again roll it. Much easier now right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
or try riding a bike around town with flat tires....you'll sweat your a$$ off trust me hahahaha more air is better. atleast to a point
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
well is it the same with all tires cuz i have low profile tires and their 205/40/17. It says max press 44psi, I currently have about 35psi. Use to have about 40 psi for like 6 months but yesterday i took it out and kept 35psi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,995 Posts
solano21 on May/08/06 said:
yea i get about 284 on a turbo gsr, then 300 on highway
miles per tank are not useful when looking at fuel economy, everyone fills up at a diff level. Miles per gallon (with the actual gallons you pump) is how you do it.

Anybody who wants to post their miles per gallon, feel free to dig up one of the many mpg threads we have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,951 Posts
dab7wr2 on May/08/06 said:
uhh physics would prove that more air in the tire would cause LESS friction on the read, hence less tire touching the road and greater MPG.

with less air, more of the tire will touch causing more friction and a decrease in MPG.
It's more complicated than that. The friction from the tire is always good. The tires are in contact with the road under laws of static friction, so more friction isn't going to slow you down, only give you better traction.

Think about it, as the tire's rolling, the same point of rubber contacts the same point of asphalt as the tire rolls. There is no sliding, so friction from the tire to the road gives no resistance against the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,995 Posts
there is something more to it than that... i've search a lot and it says that if your tires are inflated to the proper PSI rather than underinflated, you will improve fuel economy, which is what i've always thought anyways.

In the static friction example where friction is not dependant of surface area (if i remember my physics right), the bottom of the tire is always relative to the ground as you say. But that's not the real world

listen to a truck with 44 inch tires going by and a passenger car. You can actually hear the tires. Heat, sound ect... I think it has something to do with the tread of the tire itself.

link

low-resistant tires are being developed and used in hybrid cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
fuel milage has alot to do with how wide your tires are also, i can get 300 plus miles out of a tank in my gsr, and im running 205 45 17 tires
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,995 Posts
Here's what i was thinking, definition of rolling resistance

"Several factors affect the magnitude of rolling friction a tire generates:

Material - Tires with higher sulfur content tend to have a lower rolling friction. This is one strategy that most hybrid car vendors use to improve fuel efficiency.

Dimensions - rolling friction is proportional to the contact area of the tire - so a thinner tire will exhibit less friction (but also less grip) than a wider one.

Extent of inflation - Partially inflated tires tend to suffer higher rolling friction. This may lead to overheating and may have played a part in the infamous Ford Explorer rollover accidents. "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
^^^bout the ford tires blowing up and stuff...someone told me that they reccomended you to have 26psi and that is way...too low espiaclly for that heavy of a car. even our little cars are said to have 32psi. so u can imagine how under inflated the tires are on thos fords (that kept on blowing tires and rolling over.)
just keep ur tire psi where ur car manufacture reccomends (for street, but at the track u can lower it for better traction.)
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top