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Discussion Starter #1
I was reading a post that was about an automatic being TOO fast and they mentioned stuff like a torque converter and a shift kit. What exactly are those and what exactly do they do? Will they make the car any faster? Will it make it semi comprable to having a stick? thanks for the help.
 

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From what I gaathered, all a shift kit does is push the point where tranny shifts to a higher point on the rpm gauge. I hope I'm wrong about this, cause that seems kinda pointless
 

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A Torque Converter is fluid-filled case that contains a set of turbines - there is an input turbine that is driven by the engine, an output turbine that connected to the transmission's input shaft, and a stator turbine between them that directs and controls the flow of the fluid.

At a certain input RPM, the torque converter will reach its maximum fluid flow. Below this input RPM, there is poor hydraulic "coupling" between the input turbine and the output turbine - there is a lot of "slippage". Above this input RPM there is a hydraulic "lockup" - there is almost no slippage between the input turbine and the output turbine. This certain input RPM is called the "stall speed" of the converter. This property of a torque converter allows an engine to rev-up to a speed where it begins to make significant power (commonly referred to as "torque multiplication") before being put under a heavy load. The stall speed of a torque converter needs to be carefully matched to the torque curve of the engine it will be used with. A high-performance or race engine, which makes power only at high RPM, needs a torque converter that has a very high stall speed.

You cannot check the stall speed of a torque converter by pulling the transmission into gear, holding a vehicle with the brakes and adding power -- the drive-wheels will begin to spin long before you reach full-power. The proper way to check the stall speed is to make a standing-start, abrupt, foot-to-the-floor acceleration run and note the RPM shown on the tach at the instant the vehicle begins to move. This test actually measures "flash stall", but this is usually very close to the true stall speed of the converter. Also, this test is only valid if the tires do not begin to spin and if the engine can develop sufficient torque to actually reach the rated stall speed. If the tires spin, the apparent stall speed will be high. If the engine does not develop sufficient torque for the converter, the apparent stall speed will be low.

Some torque converters have an internal, hydraulically operated "lockup clutch" in them. At some preset point, the transmission will cause this converter lockup clutch to engage in order to mechanically lock the input turbine and the output turbine together. This improves the vehicles efficiency a bit because the slight slippage between the input turbine and the output turbine is eliminated. As a side benefit, some "engine braking" is also available when you take your foot off the accelerator.

The internal parts of the turbines are manufactured from formed sheet metal vanes and machined rings. In most "stock" quality torque converters, the assembly of these parts is primarily accomplished by interlocking mechanical means. In high quality, heavy-duty and high performance torque converters, the turbine assemblies are completely welded or furnace brazed together to provide for a stronger and more robust unit.

As with the rest of the transmission, excessive heat and contamination is what will kill a torque converter. Since the fluid in the torque converter is ATF supplied by the transmission, wear particles and/or bits and pieces of a blown-up transmission will end up in the converter, thereby destroying it. Changing the ATF at regular intervals and installing an external transmission cooler will lead to maximum torque converter life. If an in-radiator transmission cooler fails, ATF contamination with engine coolant will destroy a lockup torque converter.



shift kit will

Fixes early rev limiter max out on shifts, slide bump shifts, no shifts, no 2nd or 3rd gear, no engagement.
Increases performance and drivability.
A must for NOS, Turbo, or Super Charged machines.
Time 5-8 hours. Skill 3 transmission removal necessary.
Performance enhanced when used in conjunction with I112-2750 SHIFTRoNIC, JA313-1000 TORQUE CoNVERTER or our BILLET AXELS.
Torque 400 ft. 500 HP.


copied from leveltens site
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks allot for the answers guys. do they make shift kits and torque converters for a 91 integra?
 

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PTS TORQUE CoNVERTER
HoNDA / ACURA
Modification Service.
We can work our magic on your converter and turn it into a performance systems converter.
Ship you converter to our experts and we'll return it ready to go


Increase performance and ET
Higher durability
Eliminates spongy or soft engagement on acceleration from a stop
Best used with I112-2750 SHIFTRoNIC, BILLET AXLES.
Please provide desired stall speed on checkout form
Honda Acura 1992-up all
 

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DoDgE_ThiS_ on Sep/06/02 said:
You are wrong, i driven in a car with a shift kit, the difference is very noticeable.
So what is the difference??
 

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Ummm, u know what, i'm thinking that its something like the shifttronic tranny they got in the prelude.. u knwo the one u can switch from auto the semi manuel.. i wonder if u could swap the prelude tranny into the teg? ...

but then again, a manuel convert would be cheaper and more efficient...
 

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Frank on Sep/08/02 said:
Ummm, u know what, i'm thinking that its something like the shifttronic tranny they got in the prelude.. u knwo the one u can switch from auto the semi manuel.. i wonder if u could swap the prelude tranny into the teg? ...

but then again, a manuel convert would be cheaper and more efficient...
LevelTen has a plug in version.
 
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