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Well they say that the turbo is set for 10psi on this gsr. 10psi is the maximum amount of boost you can put on a stock honda engine with out blowing the thing up. 10 psi is still alot of force and will wear out your engine. What im doing is Im buying new internals for my motor. Its really woth it plus you can run 15 psi with out having to wory about it.
 

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you also got to remember they are using a hondata system to tune it. that is a big factor in getting that amount of power.
 

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It has been talked about for as long as I can remember. Nobody can say how much boost stock internals can handle. It is like saying how high can you rev a B18C1 with stock valve train? Some say 8.2K some say 9K. It all matters how strong you engine is now. If it is not balanced well, bearings or rod bolts are getting old, piston rings starting to give you won't be able to handle boost at all. My car never hit 3 LBS of boost and the bearing spun on the first cylinder. So make sure that your engine is in tip top condition if you are going to try 10 LBS on stock internals. Even if the rods and pistons can handle the boost it might be a good thing to replace all your internals becuase while your at it you replace your rod and main bearings. Have a chance to put in ARP bolts and studs. Get some new rings. Get some lower compression pistons that are designed for forced induction. Put in a new head gasket. And have a chance to balance your engine. I know it is costly but so is blowing your engine. I am a hypocrit. I just bought all the internals for my engine and now I am selling them because I ran out of money and it is going to cost me another grand to have it all installed and balanced. But I am doing this knowing that I am taking the risk of blowing another engine. I figure if you can barely afford to buy a turbo kit and barly scrape by doing so you shouldn't get a turbo. It is an on going investment and you need money to support it. You have to change your oil with synthetic ever 2000 miles. You have to be able to aford to fix it when it brakes (unless you have another car)and you have to buy the latest electronics to make it faster
 

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Oh yea and about the "aren't the stock internals made to handle boost?" of course not. They are made for NA as are all integra so far..(maybe some day when they bring back the integra it will come with an optional turbo, hey I can dream can't I
)There are many differences when you compare NA internals with Forced Induction ones. But I won't get into that. All I will say is they CAN handle boost but they were not designed to. You can use dry wall screws on wood but they weren't designed for it, but they work.
 

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98turbors on Sep/13/02 said:
You have to be able to aford to fix it when it brakes (unless you have another car)and you have to buy the latest electronics to make it faster
.TYPO!! BREAKS!!! NOT BRAKES!!... Sorry, i'm just bored at work. I wanna go home and work on my integ.

It's true though... anytime you go do anything to a motor to make it work harder than it was originally designed you risk breaking stuff... so it's a good idea to keep longevity in mind and how much $$$ it will cost you in the long run.
 

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Sorry, I have my Wilwood 11" 4 pistons on my mind...
plus I am a very poor speller. There should be a spell check on this thing.
 

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That will be determined by the tuning and fuel that is used for the setup. I've had turbocharged integras last for over 4 years, and the only reason why they rebuilt the motor was for more boost in the long run. When we took the motor apart, everything in the head and block was in TIP TOP shape, including compression numbers, no signs of detonation or uncontrolled spark, no sign of wear on the bearings. But it was all because he kept it simple, and had the tunning done CORRECTLY..
 

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seems like that hondata gsr should be making more power on 10 pounds of boost.
 

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Again. It's all on the tuning itself, not JUST the software system used. We were very impressed with STYLETEGGSR's E-manage tune. the results were more promising than expected.
 

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Dont look at peak HP numbers. Look at the flat torque curve. In drag racing that can be more important then peak numbers. As with any type of racing. A little over 250 FI HP may not seem like alot. But if the torque curve is flat across the board it will help tremendously with accleration.

Also as stated above, the stock internals can handle boost, but they arent designed for it. But how much or how long they can handle the extra stress will be mainly dictated by the tune done on the motor. You can spend 10K on a motor build up. But goto the dyno and have one mishap. Like run lean for a splice second on high boost. Or run to much timing(or not enough timing for that matter) and your 10K engine will be toast in a matter of seconds. I would say if you get the motor tune by a good tuner who knows the limits of pump gas and has a good idea of what kind of timing to run on your motor and runs a safe margin for A/F ratio's. Then I see no problem running 10+ psi on the stock motor. Now it might not last as long as if you tuned it on 6 psi. But it would be a hell of alot more fun.

Just keep searching and do your research and you will help yourself out in the long run. Because you will know whats going on with your motor and know when something is wrong and take care of it before something bad happens. Always keep a constant eye on everything. You cant just put a kit on and get it tuned correctly and just run it like a stock turboed car. Things can happen. So you want to always be on top of things. To make sure everything is in order.
 
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