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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, there are great threads on removing or bypassing Power Steering on Gen3 tegs. on our Gen 2's the P/S rack and system is a little different. Here are some threads from G2IC and Honda Tech on how to bypass the PS rack (convert it to manual) so you can remove the pump and system.

G2IC Writeup


For Zoomintegra's write up at G2IC said:
90-93 Integra Power Steering Removal
Words: Mark (zoomintegra)
Snaps: Jonna (mojogsr92) and Jake (turbogeekDA6)


First off, I gotta send props where they’re due. I couldn’t have done this mod without reading posts by Jonna and viewing photos contained therein, and I couldn’t have done this writeup without the help of Jake and his trusty digicam. Big ups to both these kids for the help they contributed, whether they know it or not.

Now on to the meaty stuff…..so you’re sick of p/s takin up room in your engine bay and creating parasitic drag on your engine, eh? Well let’s fix that, whattaya say? Some of your options:

1. Remove PS Belt
2. Swap in manual rack
3. Breather setup (explained soon enough, just stay with me)
4. Looped rack setup (the method I’ll be delving into most)

First off, plenty of people have tried step 1, removing the belt. While this solves the problem of parasitic drag off the engine, it does nothing to free up space in the engine bay, nor does it remove the immense weight of the power steering pump, reservoir, oil cooler, and hardlines, as well as all that viscous fluid. Another drawback is the amount of force needed to steer at low speeds due to the pressurized fluid in the system with no assistance from the pump anymore. It’s a start, however, and usually will hopefully lead to more in-depth removal at a later date.

As far a swapping for a manual rack, this definitely addresses not only the parasitic drag but also the major weight issue. The manual rack from the 88-91 civic is a direct bolt-in and also weighs far less than the DA power rack—7 lbs 11 oz to be exact! (source: Ben Ogle’s EF Tech Site) Not to mention all the weight saved by removing the p/s pump, reservoir, cooler, lines, and fluid. All in all it figures to around 18-20 pounds saved. However, the one drawback I found while using the manual rack is that the steering ratio suffers. It requires more turns lock-to-lock, and on a track that just won’t do. Heck, even on the street, the fun factor suffers because of it. Which leads us to our next two options, using a breather on the existing power rack, and looping the existing power rack. We’ll explore the breather first.

The premise for this setup is that the lines for the power steering gearbox are attached to a breather tank. 2 of the lines are looped onto each other, and the other 2 are teed into a small breather tank to allow air and fluid to circulate through the system. I first came upon this idea when surfing Honda-tech and came upon this thread (which is an EXCELLENT resource if you prefer to use this method). The weight savings aren’t as great as they are with the manual rack, however, the small weight you retain in this driver’s opinion more than makes up for the ease of turning found at lower speeds with this setup. one of the major drawbacks found was that the breather can have a tendency to become Old Faithful during hard cornering, so constant monitoring of fluid level and engine bay cleanliness come into play. However, upon further scraping I came upon something even cooler….


…And that’s where the looped rack option comes into play. I was trolling in the auto-x forum of Honda-tech and came upon this thread with lots of details thanks to Jonna, member mojogsr92. I saw jonna’s photos and decided to embark on this route myself, adding a special twist. I removed the valves from inside the rack, thus relieving a major area of bottleneck and resistance to fluid flow, which also (at the time, in theory) should create an even easier-to-turn low speed rack. The following is a detailed explanation of the steps for my method, with photos courtesy of Jake, member turbogeekDA6 on G2IC. Enjoy, and if you have any questions feel free to email me!

--Mark (zoomintegra)
[email protected]

Disclaimers: Please remember, this supplementary article is no replacement for the factory service repair manual and a good mechanical knowledge base. Also, the procedure described herein is definitely going to be a messy one, but then, how much fun can it be working on your car if you don’t get a little greasy, right? on to the fun stuff.

Step 1: Obviously, you’ll need to remove the rack. The process is described in the helms manual, so I won’t delve into it very deeply here. You’ll need to disconnect the steering joint inside the car by the pedal assembly, as well as remove the outer tie rod ends from the rack, drop the exhaust and shift linkage, and disconnect the 4 lines in the rack. This can get quite messy, so be careful and make sure to have a receptacle available to catch the fluid. once this is done, you have 4 bolts to remove, 14mm. 2 on the passenger side and 2 on the driver’s side. Carefully lower the rack out of the vehicle.

Step 2: once the rack is out of the car, you’ll need to remove the valve body unit cover. This is done by using a 10mm socket to remove the bolts illustrated here with a red dot:



Step 3: You won’t be able to remove all 3 bolts; 2 will come out and 1 will come out part way. This is all you need, as the cover will slide away from the valve body unit. When this happens, it should look like this:



Step 4: The bolt marked in blue is the one that will not come out all the way. The parts marked in red are what you will be removing. The long rod-type piece will slide out either direction, and behind it will be 2 metal slugs, followed by 2 springs, followed by 2 more metal slugs. Also, there are 2 springs to the right in the picture. Behind them are a couple valves that will come out. When everything is done, your valve body unit will look like this:



And here’s everything that came out of the valve body unit, for inventory purposes:



Step 5: Put your rack back together, but keep it out of the car for now. We have other things to worry about first!

Step 6: Time for the looping. You’re going to need fittings for the rack; I used the factory fittings and just cut the hardline about 2-3 inches off the fitting. You can either get new fittings from Aeroquip or just use the factory ones like I did. My philosophy is since you have the fittings there already, might as well use them, right? In the photo below, loop lines a and b together, and loop lines c and d together. (if you’re using a breather setup, you can run either c and d or a and b to the breather and tee off the other two).



When you have the looping done, it should vaguely resemble this (photo courtesy of mojogsr92):



To add fluid to the system, I just undo the brass coupling and add fluid through the hoses that way. I will be changing fluid every time I change oil, but then, I’m an anal-retentive neurotic. You probably don’t have to be as religious, but then overcaution hasn’t killed me yet.

Step 7: With the looping done and the rack ready to go in the car, it’s time to reinstall! Which, consequently, is the opposite of reverse. It’s VERY handy to have a friend available at this point, because trying to get the pinion through the floorpan and up into the steering coupler can be trying, to say the least. I know my vocabulary was extended for the procedure.

Step 8: Enjoy your new steering setup! If you want to remove the other components (pump, reservoir, lines, oil cooler) that’s entirely up to you, and is MUCH MUCH MUCH easier with the engine out of the car. To be honest, that’s the only way you’re going to get at all the lines.

If you have any other questions, please feel free to email myself or Jake (turbogeekDA6) for more information!!
Zoomintegra -- [email protected] / AIM: AirForceTeg
turbogeekDA6 -- [email protected] / AIM: IcemansZ28
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Swedboy2999 Wrote up a how to for the valve body, since he (and others) felt that simply removing all the guts gave the steering too much slop. The feedback was this valve body modification plus new bushings gave the best road feedback and the least steering effort.

90-93 PS Valve Body Unit Assembly for PS removal DIY

SwedBoy2999 "I take no responsibility for what you do to your car." said:
This is step by step what I did to put the valve body back together. I didn't put the "Gain Control Valve" or "Pressure Control Valve" back in when I did this DIY, for the simple reason that I don't think it's needed. With them taken out it lets the PS fluid flow with less restriction then if they were in. That's just what I think, If you would like to put them back in when you re assemble your valve body that's no problem.

Also, Please be safe when working under your car!

First off, it's imperative to this operation that all of the internal components and surfaces stay clean. I Highly recommend working with gloves, in fact I changed gloves three times while working on the valve body to ensure that I didn't get any small debris or sand on the critical parts. Also If any of the parts are dirty then by all means clean them, then get them all nice and slippery with OEM Honda PS fluid.

Pictured below are all of the parts that come out of the valve body including the ones I didn't install.

(Since my lines are already looped I don't need to take off the PS lines to remove the valve body, if you have not looped your lines then you will need to take the PS lines off to continue)


Remove the two highlighted 10mm bolts. one will come all the way out, and the other is blocked by the PS line. You can use a box wrench to take it off like I did or take off that PS line and use your socket to remove the bolt. If there is PS fluid in your system then be warned it's going to come out when you pull the valve body off. You should be able to carefully pull off the valve body once the two bolts are removed. once you take it off there are two port orifices that will fall out and a couple of o-rings too, save them for later.


Remove the three 10mm bolts from the valve body once you have taken it out of the car and have setup a clean place to work.


Take the gasket and set it aside since your going to need it later, you may want to clean it now and get a bin to put your clean parts in.


At this point you should be able to separate the valve body and port housing.


Here is what the port housing looks like. Take the port seal and clean it if it's dirty, if it does not fall off the housing then just leave it there.


Place one roller in to the hole in the 4-way valve closest to the end with the seal. Then place the 4-way valve in the port housing as shown.


Make sure that the highlighted area looks like this when you place your 4-way valve in the port housing. one needs to see the groove on the 4-way valve, this is what returns the pinion to the neutral position.


Next place two of the plungers into the valve body as shown in the highlighted areas.


Now look to the other side of the valve body and place the two return springs into the valve body as shown.


The next step is to put the two remaining plungers into the valve body and slide the valve body assembly onto the port housing ensuring that none of the parts fall out in the process.


Put the remaining roller into the hole in the 4-way valve. You'll need to push down the plungers to be able to slide it in.


Tighten the three highlighted 10mm bolts to 7 lb-ft.


When one takes off the valve body unit these two jets fall out, It's a good idea to save them, even though I really don't think they are that important if you have no PS anymore. I still put them in though.


I put a little urea grease on the pinion area just for the hell of it since I don't plan on taking this apart again for a while. This is optional. The two highlighted holes are where the port orifices go, It's a PITA to get the port orifices to stay in their holes while one puts the valve body unit back on. Be carefully to not hit the pinion holder pin and also not to pinch the o-rings if they fall out of place.
Good Luck!


once you have the valve body unit back in place put the two 10mm bolts to 16 lb-ft.

Hope this helps. I have teed one of the looped lines and am putting in a tilton reservoir to hold some PS fluid so the system always has good lubrication. Just like on the real time cars.... If anyone wants picts of the tee and reservoir then I can post them by request.

Thanks reading,
~Eric


Modified by SwedBoy2999 at 8:48 AM 1/23/2006
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also as a side note,
When going LS/VTEC you need a VTEC upper PS bracket, tha't pretty much why I decided to remove the PS anyways. In the 90-93 cars we have a variable speed sensing/pressure switch, so P/S only helps under 30 mph.

The LS bracket Appear the same as do th VTEC ones, but it's hard to tell from the drawing. they als have different Part Numbers......????

Part numbers for the upper brackets:


PS bracket for B17
DWGPart NumberDescription
1456997-PR3-010BRACKET, POWER STEERING PUMP (UPPER)11992INTEGRA


Bracket for 91 LS
DWGPart NumberDescription
1556997-PR4-Q00BRACKET, POWER STEERING PUMP (UPPER)11991INTEGRA




PS Bracket for 2000 ITR
DWGPart NumberDescription
656997-P73-000BRACKET, POWER STEERING PUMP (UPPER)12000INTEGRA

PS Bracket for 2000 GSR
DWGPart NumberDescription
556997-P72-000BRACKET, POWER STEERING PUMP (UPPER)12000INTEGRA

PS Bracket for 2000 LS
DWGPart NumberDescription
456997-P54-010BRACKET, POWER STEERING PUMP (UPPER)12000INTEGRA
 

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That's great info.

I did the manual rack swap on both of my DA's using a rack from the '89 CRX Si.

I would guess that using the Civic rack would result in the three minor issues that I ran into as follows:

1. The outer tie-rod end that was on the manual rack didn't fit into the knuckle, lucky enough the Integra outer tie-rod threads onto manual racks inner tie-rod.

2. The manual steering rack body is smaller in diameter than the power one causing the mounting clamp on the passengers side to not hold the rack tight. My solution to this was to put the bushing for the power rack around the busing for the manual rack then hold them both in place while clamping the rack to the body.

3. This one might have been a unique situation to my car, but here it is anyways. on my '91 LS everything went in fine with no problems except the two above, but on my '92 GSR everything seemed to go together fine until I tried to turn the wheels. The bolt head on the u-joint between the steering column and the steering rack was hitting on the body. To fix this I ended up putting washers between the steering rack and the body to angle the shaft down a little more.
 

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This thread is sweet, it would be even sweeter if the photos came up. I have searched high and low for this article with the coresponding photos but have been unsuccessful in locating them. If anyone knows where I can find either this article with the photos or a similiar article with the how to photos please post the link here. I am trying to remove my full power steering system in my db2. I understand the principle but I would like to see it. Thanks for any help in advance.
 

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Nevermind I found them. I tried to post the link but I'm computer retaded. If you would like to see this article in it's entirety Links can be found on pages 12-14 on G2IC from the orginal thread posted here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fixed two, looking for the valve body dissassembly photos. I have the text tho.....


BTW a gen three on the "loop"
http://www.team-integra.net/forum/display_topic_threads.asp?ForumID=15&TopicID=171153&ReturnPage=&PagePosition=1&ThreadPage=1

Also I am looking for the valve dissassembly pics. they were originally hosted on WeToddid, but they went ****-up.

In the past I had fixed the links, but since the originals are no longer hosted, there is nothing to link to

I was able to find three thumbnails via googl images, so those are going in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well It's as good as it can be today.

Let me re-emphasize the fact that simply looping the hoses isn't enough. By removing the valves (not all of them) it makes the steering fluid pass easily from side to side, essentially turning it into a manual rack. I did this, it works well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No. I did Sweedboy's write-up. i will post an image of the "left-overs"
Taking out ALL the parts like the first write-up give a lot of slop. only taking out the certain valves allows for fluid flow, without the extra play.
 

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Terry, first of all thanks for the info and feed back. Second, did you include a t fitting in one of the looped lines and attach a breather? Do you think this is necessary? Also do you recall the sizes of the items used ie; hoses and type of t? It would be great to have this info before starting this job as this is my only vehicle. Thank you for your help thus far and also for any more input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The pics are gone..... I used a text editor and fixed the original write up, but boneheadedly forgot to Save-As the fixed page and the pictures.

No Tee, No breather, not needed. I drained and then filled the power steering fluid in the hoses when rebuilding the valve body. the purpose is simply to lubricate the interior, and the fluid will no longer be doing any work.

However, read the writeup, put the jets back in (from the thumbnail) as well as everything (4way valve and pin, plungers and plunger springs) EXCEPT for the circled valves and thier springs (i think I circled the right springs).



That would be both springs #33 and Part # 27 (GAIN CoNTROL VALVE) and #34 (PRESSURE CoNTROL VALVE)



some final notes: I dropped the whole rack when doing this (much easier) and removed the PS stuff and hardlines (pain in the ass). when I put it back in I installed the energy suspension bushings that came with the masterkit. you dont need to do this, but if you have them it is a good excuse to do it all at once.
- The looped hoses bump up against the metal guard that covers the valve body. I used over sized hoses, slit them down the middle lengthwise and made a rub-guard for the hoses. don't get too big with the loops, but you cant go to small without kinking.
 

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if anyone is on the fence about this, DO IT. Even if you are lazy and think it will be a hassle, i looped my gen 3 and didnt use a vent reservoir and it is just as easy as not having it, it only gets a little resistance when parallel parking, but the benefits highly outweigh the negatives, hands down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As a Side note, if you decide to completely remove the PS pump and piping you will have a sensor that is disconnected. Depending on your year, it will be C133 right by the purge/FPR/Evap relays. the PS Oil pressure sensor is normally open, and only closes when there is an excessive load.
You can recycle the female and male plugs for a VTEC solenoid or secondary O2 sensor plug. if you do this, tape off the two wires from each other (Red and Black). the red goes to the ECU and is normally positive. the Black goes to a chassis ground, and grounds out the ECU pin when the pressure sensor indcates excessive load.

But with PS removed... you'll never have this signal.
 
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