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Discussion Starter #1
Planning to get an Integra. The main thing I’m worried about is the “high” mileage on what these cars have that is up for sale (130k+). However, I plan to go FBO E85 on the build. But is it worth it on a motor that it comes in (b18 and the high miles)? Or should I swap it? But mind you I don’t want to blow a large amount of money. My budget is 1.5k for the motor and all of the components to get the car running properly (if swapping was a better idea).

In your opinion, what’s the best RELIABLE/INEXPENSIVE (but makes a good amount of power when tuned) motor to swap?

Also, one last thing: since these cars are able to take in a lot of mileage, What mileage would it be to be considered “reliable” still? what mileage should I look for? And when should I plan to swap (depending on the mileage if I get a “high” mileage vehicle)? Because if it’s 100k and below I might just upgrade the heads to a gsr and see how that goes...

Let me know what you guys think!🤙🏽
 

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The mileage on 90's Hondas/ Acuras doesn't matter. It's all about how it was maintained. Buy a compression tester and learn how to use it. It will tell you everything about the health of the engine in the car you're thinking about buying.
B18B1 - LS, GS, RS, SE: 135 : ±200 psi, max variation between cylinders: 28 psi
B18C1/5 - GSR, ITR: 135 : ±270 psi, max variation between cylinders: 28 psi

The higher the non-boosted compression, the better condition the valves and piston seals are in and the more power the engine can still produce. As the compression falls off, so does the power. High numbers (e.g. mine...205 x4 at 185,000 mi) is a good sign that the engine has had its oil changed regularly (in my case every 3,000 mi like clockwork) and serviced whenever it needed it. Low numbers or wildly varying numbers mean that the engine was abused and you should either buy another car or account for replacing the engine immediately when buying the frame (lowball them). Numbers don't lie.

Bit of advice: 90's Honda engines don't run on E85. Only use that if you want to destroy the engine. I had actually taken to doing the exact opposite and starting using pure gasoline again (G100). Where I live in Florida, boating is popular and everybody has lawns that need constant cutting due to 9 mo. of summer each year. Ethanol-free fuel is readily available & has 30% more energy content per gallon and doesn't corrode fuel system components. Instead of gumming everything up with corn sludge, it keeps everything sparkling clean. I don't know why anyone would intentionally run their car on corn filler, but a guy who installs E85 conversions on the Nissan GTR forums said it typically costs $10,000.

Here's some ideas (the sky's the limit) if you buy a shell and build / replace the engine. It just depends how deep your pockets are. If they're not that deep, you should stop while you're ahead because building classic Integras/ Preludes/ Civics/ etc. is an expensive hobby. You can do a few things with $1,500, but probably not as much as you think.
  • LS B18 just maintain it
  • LS Built
  • CRV B20 swap
  • LS VTEC
  • GSR swap
  • USDM ITR swap
  • JDM ITR swap
  • Prelude H22/23 swap
  • K20 swap
  • Or if you're really feeling brave go find a vintage Legend V6. It will require a lot of custom work, but it can be done.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The mileage on 90's Hondas/ Acuras doesn't matter. It's all about how it was maintained. Buy a compression tester and learn how to use it. It will tell you everything about the health of the engine in the car you're thinking about buying.
B18B1 - LS, GS, RS, SE: 135 : ±200 psi, max variation between cylinders: 28 psi
B18C1/5 - GSR, ITR: 135 : ±270 psi, max variation between cylinders: 28 psi

The higher the non-boosted compression, the better condition the valves and piston seals are in and the more power the engine can still produce. As the compression falls off, so does the power. High numbers (e.g. mine...205 x4 at 185,000 mi) is a good sign that the engine has had its oil changed regularly (in my case every 3,000 mi like clockwork) and serviced whenever it needed it. Low numbers or wildly varying numbers mean that the engine was abused and you should either buy another car or account for replacing the engine immediately when buying the frame (lowball them). Numbers don't lie.

Bit of advice: 90's Honda engines don't run on E85. Only use that if you want to destroy the engine. I had actually taken to doing the exact opposite and starting using pure gasoline again (G100). Where I live in Florida, boating is popular and everybody has lawns that need constant cutting due to 9 mo. of summer each year. Ethanol-free fuel is readily available & has 30% more energy content per gallon and doesn't corrode fuel system components. Instead of gumming everything up with corn sludge, it keeps everything sparkling clean. I don't know why anyone would intentionally run their car on corn filler, but a guy who installs E85 conversions on the Nissan GTR forums said it typically costs $10,000.

Here's some ideas (the sky's the limit) if you buy a shell and build / replace the engine. It just depends how deep your pockets are. If they're not that deep, you should stop while you're ahead because building classic Integras/ Preludes/ Civics/ etc. is an expensive hobby. You can do a few things with $1,500, but probably not as much as you think.
  • LS B18 just maintain it
  • LS Built
  • CRV B20 swap
  • LS VTEC
  • GSR swap
  • USDM ITR swap
  • JDM ITR swap
  • Prelude H22/23 swap
  • K20 swap
  • Or if you're really feeling brave go find a vintage Legend V6. It will require a lot of custom work, but it can be done.
Good luck.
Much love goes out to you man! I appreciate the input I really needed that. Thank you!!
 

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Just an FYI, I would not trust the mileage on any 90's Honda/Acura. As the entire cluster can be changed out with like 4 screws. Do a free vin check on car fax. It will tell you actual mileage from service stations & smog checks. That will tell you the truth.
 

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I’ve got 778,000 on my ‘96 integra LS. I bought it new. Drive it everyday still. Do all my own maintenance. I’ve got a ‘95 too with 330,000 miles. I bought it from the original owner.
 
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