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Can we put platinum plugs in LS's because the dealer said that they are not suppose to be in there?
 

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if you run high heat and high revs for along time (more than 15 sec bursts), a platinum plug allows you the luxury of running wider gaps and provides the same energy as a copper plug in dense chamber environments like in 11.5-12:1 CR chambers . There is less chance of fouling as when you use narrow gaps from carbon build up and therefore less misfiring over time.

Yes copper is cheaper by a country mile but the application in a car that is up there in compression, temps, and revs for continuous use makes them more prone to misfiring under these conditions.

Even the stock LS has 2 options, one is a number 5 heat range copper plug for everyday grocery getter driving and a number 6 heat range (colder) platinum plug for " more performance oriented " driving. You can't go wrong with a #6 platinum gapped at 0.044 in. in an LS if you plan to thump it a lot and have mods.
 

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MichaelDelaney on Aug/23/02 said:
a number 6 heat range (colder) platinum plug for " more performance oriented " driving. You can't go wrong with a #6 platinum gapped at 0.044 in. in an LS if you plan to thump it a lot and have mods.
Can someone just tell me if this the spark plug being refered to? NGK
Part number PZFR5F-11
gap 0.044
 

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Thanks! Spark plugs are expensive!
 

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Dom just get copper-platinum tipped plugs then (cheaper) but don't expect them to last as long. you're ahead of most people if you know what heat range to run and what gap to run without fouling up the plug.

it's not like you're running in a high CR touring car race engine for an 1 hr at almost full throttle for at least 60% of the time, never dropping the revs below 6000 rpm during that 1 hr, and the engine temp is astranomical. That's when the plug performance becomes critical.

for most people with i/h/c/e and street/strip ambitions, the #6 heat rating with a 0.040-0.044 in. gap does the job. Platinums because of their finer design gives a more precise kernel and ionization. They also last longer. If that's important to you, then spend the money. If your budget says that this is ridiculous for what I use my car for, then get copper.

It's pretty simple.
 

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MD, thanks for your input. The thought of going cheaper had crossed my mind, but I have spent far more money on things for my car that have done nothing for performance. I would like to think these days are over. I think I would rather just do the spark plugs correctly and spend the extra money, especially if they will last longer...Im a firm beleiver in "you get what you pay for"
 

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Where do you locate a spark plugs heat range? I am looking on the NGK site and am unable to find it. Is it just common knowledge or do they post specific heat ratings?

Alright I found the heat rating in a post saks put up a while ago, sorry. But all the plugs on the ngk page that was linked to are #5 plugs. Where is this #6 plug that you speak of MD.
 

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If you're on a budget I'd get the G-power platinum (GP platinum) instead of the double platinums. They cost 9 dollars less and are almost as durable.

If you're willing to spend 11 dollars a plug you mareswell spend 5 dollars less and get iridiums. Iridiums are definetly the most durable plug available, something I'm pretty interested in with 1500 degree EGT's.
 
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