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Discussion Starter #1
This is driving me crazy. I can't find an online unit converter that will translate Newton Meters (NM) to lb.-ft. Anyone know of one? Or even the formula?

I've got kW to hp (I think) but if you know a converter that'll do both that'd be fantastic.

Thanks
 

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there is no one converter...its a long problem you have to work out. i'll try it out, but i hate physics, and my notebook with that problem is at my apartment at school (still at home for 2 more weeks). if i get it, i'll post it up.
 

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If you have a dyno chart, just use your conversion for kW to HP, then from that convert HP into lbs-ft using the equation

(5252*HP)/RPM = Torque
 

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Discussion Starter #7
irontegra on Aug/11/02 said:
NM is lb*ft/sec
No. NM and lb-ft are metric and English units of torque measurement. A NM is more closely related to a KGM (kilogram meter) than a lb-ft.

If you dissect them, you can see that:

Newton: Metric unit of weight
Meter: Metric unit of distance

Pound: English unit of weight
Foot: English unit of distance

In all actuality, it is not a pound-foot at all but a foot-pound (at least in Physics). In the English system we have a propensity for doing things backwards. But in the automotive industry doing the reverse, lb-ft, perhaps because of its relation to the metric system of doing things (and its logic), though in Physics you probably won't see it that way.

I should have had the notes on this conversion from my Physics class but a.) I didn't want to find them and b.) I'd prefer having a conversion calculator do the math for me.
 

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robertmcdonald on Aug/11/02 said:
In all actuality, it is not a pound-foot at all but a foot-pound (at least in Physics). In the English system we have a propensity for doing things backwards. But in the automotive industry doing the reverse, lb-ft, perhaps because of its relation to the metric system of doing things (and its logic), though in Physics you probably won't see it that way.
I was under the impression that it really didn't matter. Since lbs-ft really means lbs*ft and with multiplication it doesn't matter what order you use since you'll get the same product either way. That's like arguing what is the correct way to multiply 5 and 4 together. You'll still get 20 no matter what order you try to multiply them.
 
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