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If anyone could give me a link to a similar or the same post it would be much appreciated. I just had a question about ecu's and which kind, if any. Can keep the turbo constantly spooled. I wouldn't be running high psi probably 6 or 8. All the posts I read, talk about waiting for the boost. But in most manufactured cars the turbos are usually always on. Either that or they have a really low boost threshold. If this is the case what turbo would be required to have constant boost from say 2500 to 4500 rpm? For example the new Turbo Beetle has a similar powerband with the use of a turbo. I read about how the supercharger like JSC gives really good low end torque, but even that I think has a bypass valve so it is not always boosting correct? Sorry for the long post. Thanks for your time.
 

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Turbos are not always on in other cars. Perhaps you are getting them confused with superchargers...??? I dunno. If you want less turbo lag you need a smaller turbo, like a Greddy.

Turbos run on exhaust gasses, which I'm sure you are aware of, so I'm not so sure an ECU can be programmed to keep the turbo spooling.
 

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And BTW, I'm not an expert or anything but I'm sure the beetle has a pretty small turbo...that means quicker spooling. Plus they don't have redlines at 8100 or above...
 

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I've never heard of a ecu or chip giving you the ability to boost constantly instead of WOT (supercharger) or at certain rpm (turbo). In most manufactured turbo cars like the ecplise, beetle, wrx, etc. they have a small turbo and boosting small amt of psi. This will give you the ability to lose that turbo lag everyone hates. Yes your right about the JSC they do have a bypass valve and your not always boosting. JSC made it so that you only boost when you hit WOT. I hope this helps......
 

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if you want the power all the time sounds like you want a supercharger cause with turbos come turbo lag dont think science has eliminated that yet but they are getting close like twin ball bearing turbos
 

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There are some ECM/PCM's that will revmatch automatically, and keep your throttle body open, which prevents a turbo from spooling down between shifts. However, you're always going to suffer from spool up lag.
 

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if you have a turbo, you have lag. nothin you can do about it. no reason to keep spooled anyway...it'll just wear the turbines down. just downshift.
 

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No load usually equals no boost. But to keep the Turbo constantlly spooled is going to equal an extreme amount of heat. I would suggest an Anti Lag system, but this is not for use on a daily driven car. More to the point the more I read about them, I found they are primarily used in WRC styled events. Anti Lag is actually a Misfiring System (shameless plug for Initial D, those who know will get it!) Anyway I've found after much reading and specualtion of how great it is, hardly anyone will tell you, (from ignorance about it,) that it isn't supposed to be used for more then a certain amount of time. Most writings that I read from a Eurpean test on an antilag system reported Cracked Tubular Headers, hairline fractured Turbine housings, along with destroyed turbine wheel which also leads to the turbos destruction itself. this is nto an everyday use product, however if you don't mind replacing these items often as wel as the occiasional head from warpage of heat, you can usally push the system for nearly 200 KM wihtout fail. (Damn, i wish I knew the source I read that from.)

How it works:
The cheap ones usually involve the addition of an electronic box w/coil, and a spark plug bung in the manifold. When you activiate the system it watches for an RPM drop and fires causing the unburnt gas to exlpode causing the turbine to spool up. The least effective way, there isnt' much unburtn fuel left in your exhaust, see below.

The good systems usually take over the ignition system for your car. The system monitors your timing and when you pull your foot off the gas you timing changing dramatically. That timing change then causes the plug to fire while the exhaust valve is open after no fuel was burned form the power stroke. In laymans terms, that means the you injected the fuel compressed it, didn't fire, and pushed it out, while on its way out the plug fires causing the explosion to happen in the manifold causing the turbo to spool. This is the most effective Anti Lag that i know of.

I know there are more knowledgable people then I to describe this, I hope they see the thread to put straight anything I might have put wrong.
 

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if you want constant boost, you need multiple rev limits... something you can get through the full-throttle shifts with hondata, stage 3 i think
 

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DaBoyNBlu on Sep/03/02 said:
if you want constant boost, you need multiple rev limits... something you can get through the full-throttle shifts with hondata, stage 3 i think
From My experiance with cars that come turboed, (I have asked a few mechanics though,) When thee is not load there is no boost is what I'm told, how could multiple rev limits remove that?
 

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Does not matter if it came from the factory Turboed or not....When you hit the gas and the determined wastegate setting reaches it's "GIVE" boost setting you have POSITIVE PSI/BOOST !

Simple: Step on the Gas= Possible Positive Boost ! It is very possible to step on the gas SLOWLY and NOT hit POSITIVE boost keep that in mind !

Come on guys this is Turbo 101 stuff...Its all been here on the site for months now....
 

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* AEM's computer as well as the Hondata have options for keeping the throttle open between shifts.

* Having a "load" on the engine isn't what spools the turbine, its exhaust gas flowing over the vanes. If you have the car in neutral and rev the piss out of it, you're going to spool the turbo. What causes the turbo to spool down between shifts is the throttle body closing, which restricts air going into your manifold, which increases the pressure in your intake piping (because your turbine is still spinning), at which point it overcomes the exhaust gas pressure in your turbine, and slows the turbine slow down. This is what caused turbines to sh*t themselves before blow-off valves and ceramic thrust bearings were developed. (Turbo 101 stuff
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* When you keep air flowing through your intake tract and into your engine, you provide a path of little resistance. This allows your turbine to keep chugging away. Keeping your turbine spinning isn't what causes wear. The shaft between the turbine wheel and compressor wheel rides on a virtual bearing of oil. There's no metal to metal. What will wear out is your thrust bearings which regulate side-to-side movement, and are worn by abrupt changes in turbine speed.


Personally, I wouldn't trust any product that promoted post-cylinder combustion. You'd start doing all sorts of nasty things to valves, and not to mention your manifold from extreme change in heat and pressure.
Integragsr6 touched on probably the most important point: properly size your turbine and compressor. That, in most cases, can eliminate a huge chunk of your lag right there.
 

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After talkign to friend who added a turbo to his B16 powered CRX at lunch, I found a few thigns.

Free reving the car with the clutch in only caused a bit of boost, and the engine went back into vaccum Very quickly, (almost instantly, I find it obsured that you will stay in boost, and would like some sort of proof, video, etc.) Same is true with my factory equipped turbo car. While we did this from a roll at around 70 mph, the car did get back into boost quicker, but we both came to the conclusion this is harsh on the drivetrain. More to the point his experiance at the track, he tells me if you keep the pedal to floor in between shifts, (I would never do this, not even with a stutter box.) The car does spool the turbo a little quicker, but not really worth the .2" He got out of doing this in a straight line at the track., (He finishes just after shifting into 4th.) Not to mention he does notice the clutch takes some abuse by the obvious smell produced.
 

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BoostControl on Sep/04/02 said:
Well that was long winded
! But an excellent point and accurate good info to know Mr.Rooster ! Welcome !
Thanks

I would have just referred someone to a book, but I think its vital the correct information be heard and some common myths dispelled.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
To everyone who answered with their own knowledge and advice. I just wanted to give you all a quick thank you. It helped me out a lot. As all of you probably know my own experience with turbos is limited, even after reading and re-reading the articles :) Thanks again.
 

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I was pondering almost the same concept on the turbo lag issue before I decided to go turbo, but I know you can't eliminate the lag. But isn't the objective to reduce the lag as much as possible by allowing more exhaust gas to spool up the turbine? With that in mind, wouldn't a lightened flywheel be a pretty good factor considering it allows you to rev quicker thus allowing you to get the exhaust gases in the turbine faster? Just a thought.

And what about N2O? Would that help any?
 
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