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Just as the subject says.

I want to work for Acura (Honda). Whether it be a car salesman or mechanical engineer. Does anybody have a job working for Acura/Honda? Is anybody a dealer? If so, can you post requirements, training, and courses, etc. etc.?
I would like to work for Honda or something related as a mechanical engineer. I plan on majoring in mechanical engineering in college. Suggestions, experience? Perhaps this way we can learn what it takes to get jobs with the car we all love, the Integra.
 

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Im not sure about acura but my friend is a sales manager at Honda. Apparantly they'll hire anyone for sales for at least a month to test you out. There is a license that you hafta apply for though which is a 100 dollars. In terms of parts dept I've been trying to get into that for a while but positions open up once in every 8 - 12 months. I guess people really like Honda.
 

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My Dad has worked for a ton of dealerships before (as a technician), including one Ford/Honda one, and he said that if you want to be a parts guy the only thing you really need is previous experience (at a parts place like Napa or something). As far as being a technician goes, my Dad said you have two options: you can either start at the bottom (for example as a "lube guy") or have previous experience.

I don't know anything about sales but I'm kinda considering it, myself. I mean, selling computers and printers at Office Depot is one thing, but I think I can apply my burgoing sales skills to something I really like--namely cars!--and get better results/be happier with it. Ultimately, of course, I'd wanna sell Porsches, but Acura certainly wouldn't be a bad start...


Any questions for my Dad?
 

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I know that technician don't get paid by the hour. How long has your dad been working and about how much is he getting each month $$$$. I am looking into being one and already strated to take classes in college.
 

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I Think tech's get paid Flat rate, if you get a 12.50 flat rate, and you look at a book, it says it takes 1 hour to do somthing, and you do it in 30 minutes, you get 12.50 in that 30 min. If the book says it takes 3 hours, and u do it in 1 hour, you get 37.50 for the hour, get it?
 

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I knew that but i just wanted to see what his dad is getting at the end of each month to see what the range is for a tech. How many exp does he have under his belt. I know a lot of new techs are really takeing longer then it says in the book and thats what kind of is makeing me not wanting to be one. Your all by yourself and throw in to something you might not know what your doing. Is there like a year where your buddy up with someone, i know that wont happen but just wondering.
 

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If you want to be a technician, Universal Technical Institute is a good place to start. I graduated from the R.C. CA campus. It's expensive, but I believe worth it. I balanced out the theoretical/engineering side of my resume with some practical training and am looking for more of a R&D/engineering job. If you want to be a tech, you are pretty much gauranteed a job after you graduate. Many of the car companies will pay for your further brand specialized training at their facilities and gaurantee you a job with their company after you finish their training. The also have a Nascar program. Here.
 

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yeah your right 95integra, Newer techs do go slower than the book, thats why they actually have a hourly rate, After so long the tech and supervisor can talk and set up a flat rate, when he can start doing the work on time. Newer tech's are usually called mechanics, and those are usually the ones who get hourly payment. My teacher said he was getting 90,000 a year at his job when he built tranny's for the ford motor company. so that'd leave like 6,500 a month i guess. But anyone who knows the ''normal'' amount would be appriciated, cuz i'd like to know as well
 

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one of my roommates from college is a mechanical engineer working in the auto industry. At one time he was working for Honda in Ohio, but he has since moved to Michigan and I'm not sure where he works now. While he worked for Honda, his work was not directly with the cars, but in the assembly plant design. I believe that most of the actual automotive mechanical design is based in Japan.

My advice to you is to look into your college alumni association and learn the names of graduates that work in the auto industry. Drop them an email expressing your interest and ask what coursework would improve your chances to find work in that industry. If you find someone that works for Honda, that's even better. Perhaps learn Japanese as a second language.
 

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95integra on Sep/15/02 said:
I know that technician don't get paid by the hour. How long has your dad been working and about how much is he getting each month $$$$. I am looking into being one and already strated to take classes in college.
(I totally forgot about this thread.
)

My Dad's been working on cars since he was 13 at his dad's repair shop. After a brief time where he didn't do it, he's basically been doing it all his life. He's 50 now and he rates himself as "only" having 30 years of experience. Mostly my Dad's worked on American stuff, but import stuff is just as common when you run your own shop (which he does). He said Hondas are way better to work on than other sh*t, especially American cars. As far as the way technicans are paid...

Depends on the shop. Flat rate is not all good, BTW. In fact, at my Dad's shop, he pays his technicans hourly instead of flat rate. Flat rate sucks when the job pays half an hour and it takes you two hours to get something done (there are some stupid jobs that are this far off). The labor time is mostly for what to charge the customer for Labor on a job (add Parts and Tax and you've got your repair cost).

If you're really fast, flat rate can be good. But if you're like most technicans, it's not really good or bad. Some jobs are awesome because you get 'em done way under the allotted time. Other jobs totally suck because they take way longer to do than they're supposed to. And then there's warranty work... Apparently that pays really sh*tty. That's the problem with working at a dealership, especially at the bottom. Independent shops can be good for getting experience at.

BTW, I'm tell you this from what I know--my dad's still at work. You know, it's only 11 pm and he got to work at 7:30 this morning--it's still early.


Another big thing I know about being a good tech is not just being able to fix things but being able to diagnose things. That's a really big thing. Techs who can do this are obviously preferred over the guys who only know how to do the right out of the book stuff or guys who can only fix things but not find what's causing the problem (there are a lot of guys like this).

Anything else?
 

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Okay, my Dad's home, so...

on average, most technicians make between $35,000-$55,000 a year (in a place like Redding, CA, where I live--which has like 80,000+ people). If you live in a place with a better economy, obviously you'll make more. Some technicans can make even more than that but it depends on how fast you are.

My Dad said it's a good thing to remember that flat rate wasn't set up to benefit the technicans. It's set up to help the shops. The estimated labor time makes sure techs are doing their work in a reasonable amount of time. If you're fast, you can make very good money... but you have to be good and fast, otherwise stuff comes back and that's really bad.

Warranty work... Ah, now there's the *****. Warranty work pays at least half what a job normally costs, sometimes way less. But, it's not always that bad. My dad says that replacing water pumps on a Chevy truck is a great example. The job pays like 3 hours normally, 1.2 for warranty work. But, he can get it done in like 35 minutes, and (at least according to him) he's not that fast, either.

So it all kinda depends. Flat rate can be good if you're fast or it can suck if you're not. Hourly can be good if you're not that fast or suck if you are. It all depends. Hourly pay is obviously good because it's consistant.

When you start out, you have two choices: you can either be a lube guy if you know nothing or you can do apprenticeship.

Okay, I think that covers it! Ya think we need a technican article on TI?
 
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