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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading though the intake manifold article, I am curious on one part discussing the best "calculated" intake piping size based on the TB diameter.

Based on my b18b engine, I went through the calculations. Please correct me if I made a calculation or math related error.

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Rounding to the nearest 100th

58mm B18B Stock throttle body

about 2.28 inches

Radius is 1.14 inches

area of the throttle body is then 3.14 (1.14^2)

3.14 * 1.30 = 4.1sqr. inches. <-- area of the the TB bore

4.1 * 1.33 = 5.5 sqr. inches. <-- How much area we want the ID of the intake pipe to have

5.5 = 3.14 * (R^2)

5.5 / 3.14 = R * R

1.75 = R * R

R = 1.32

D = 2 * 1.32 = 2.64

So 2.64" ID is the calculated "best" intake size for a 58mm throttle body.
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Now I am guessing that this is a general rule, not a one size fits all calculation.

So, can this be adjusted to alter your powerband, in conjunction with the length of the pipe?

For instance, most CAI's for LS's are 2.5", slightly smaller than the results of the calculations above. But it seams to make sense, with a CAI you are getting more intake velocity at the sacrifice of flow quantity.

My thinking is if you wanted to alter your powerband higher, go with a 2.75" piping? My inital thoughts is this would shfit the powerband upward, as it sacrfices velocity for quantity. Or, with the Tb diameter, would it be ineffecient to go above 2.64?

Another instance might be a larger short ram, where you want flow quantity instead of velocity. Instead of just sticking with a short 2.5" pipe, again would it make sense to move up to a 2.75" pipe?

Again, assuming you wanted your powerband to land higher in the RPM range.
 

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Ross if i remember correctly the area of the intake pipe should be 1.25 times larger than that of the TB , instead of the 1.33 you used , which gives us 2.56" as the "ideal" intake pipe diameter for the LS.

IMHO for a certain engine setup , the volume of air that the engine can draw in its chambers is fixed , therefore varying the intake pipe's diameter varies the speed of the air (flow quality?) rushing in the TB , but after the TB how is the air flow affected?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You are right, it is 25%. The article said that, but then said to use 1.33 in the calculation. Must be a typo.

Anyways, so altering the diameter and length definetly alters the speed of the incoming air.

Now you can go smaller than 2.5 and speed up the air velocity but sacrifice air quantity. So it seams like up until the "ideal" intake pipe diameter it is a trade off.

What I am really curious about, is there any possible benifit (in any situation, really) of going *above* the ideal intake pipe. Would going above 2.56" just be a waste since the IM/TB can only draw in a certin amount regardless of intake piping?
 

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Hi everyone! Bringing an old thread back to life.....I own a '92 Integra and have been searching all over the Internet for some info on short ram intakes in regards to the DA, and seem to get more info on DCs, etc. On the G2IC forums, the AEM short ram seems to be a popular fitment, but my question is concerning the positioning of the short rams on a DA, with falling to the other side of the battery furthest away from the engine ..... Would there still be a significant amount of power loss due to engine heat? Also, since the AEM short ram piping is smaller in diameter, would an Injen short ram with 2.75 diameter be of any significant improvement? Now, these questions are meant for a car that is to see some track time once in a while and majority daily driving.

Thank you. Just wanted to revive your discussion because I am greatly interested in all you have to say :)

Alisha
 

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Imo short ram is short ram, either way you'll succumb to some amount of engine heat. Only two ways to reduce this.. cold air or heat guards of various form including ceramic coating, wrap or other material that blocks the filter element and piping from heat. The larger piping should be better but how much or whether you'll notice depends on your setup. Running the dyno is the only way to get a number. If you can get a good deal on one i dont see why not otherwise id go the cold air or icebox/hybrid intake route. You will probably like that better on the track and being in los angeles you dont have to worry about flooded streets for the most part depending on where you live.

Dont know if youve seen this article but if not it may help you make a decision. Thumbs up for searching through old threads but i think you found one a bit off topic to your question. haha Dont think too hard about the choices, especially for a fairly stock build or mild setup. I prefer cold air and a lot of the guys i know running track use either cai or icebox/hybrid intakes.

Intake Information - Team Integra Forums - Team Integra
 

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@NemesisCBR:

Thank you so much lol. Ya know, I'm a huge nerd and like to know everything there is before making a final decision on anything, and have soaked up so much information that, I suppose, I suffered greatly from this "heat soak" concept folks speak of lol. I just read that article you've provided, and I believe that hybrid sounds like a winner to me!

Alisha
 

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I lean towards getting as technical as (i can) possible when im interested in something too. TI has awesome articles (browse them, im serious) and ive reread, refreshed and reread multiple times just trying to remember and apply. But dont hesistate to google search for multiple sources of information. You'll end up with links to team integra, hondatech or clubintegra anyway. You can also click michael delaney's profile and select 'find all articles' by him. He's has plenty of reading material.

I wanted a hybrid intake myself after going through the article and multiple discussions and im still waiting for the opportunity to acquire one and dyno test the result on my motor against my cai but as im not trying to win anything at race level, my information gathered says the sound created from the intake is reduced on the iceboxes. Differences probably being minimal on the power band ive decided to stick with my cai for the most part, final decision pending the dyno comparison. If it proves to have a worthwhile gain then i might swap it out for track setup.

If youre into custom fabrication and diy, theres articles/guides for making your own icebox style intake. A few of which are on TI. A friend on clubintegra made his own for his type r and loves the improvement.
 

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Same here. I've gone to those sites as well. I found this after my last message : http://www.team-integra.net/forum/1...alk/125609-improved-diy-icebox-style-cai.html . Dunno if this was the car you were referring to? I just wish to be a bit competitive at the track when I go since I doubt there'll be that many women running their cars there. But just want to add to my performance since I already have a feel for my car's handling and power thus far. Tinkering for added driving enjoyment :)
 

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Thats one of the guides i was referring to. Each one kinda has its take on making one but all pretty much the same concept. The specific car i was referring to also made their own intake pipe. Its just a tube after all to speak of it in simple form. Engine performance will definately help but for road racing you should look into suspension and tires over small gains in horsepower. I dont want to go off topic so i'll pm you about the tracks.
 

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Thats one of the guides i was referring to. Each one kinda has its take on making one but all pretty much the same concept. The specific car i was referring to also made their own intake pipe. Its just a tube after all to speak of it in simple form. Engine performance will definately help but for road racing you should look into suspension and tires over small gains in horsepower. I dont want to go off topic so i'll pm you about the tracks.
you've got mail :) pm sent :)

I went through this scenario a few years back. Wanted the response from a short ram, but didn't want this heat. This is what I ended up with:



here's a good shot of the snorkle
Wow! Is this your daily driver too? Also, I thought it was important to maintain a length of pipe or tube for consistent air flow with the sensor?

Alisha
 

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That seems incredibly short. Is the filter right under the shielding?

The box has a large rectangle k&n air filter, about 300% more surface area then the stock k&n drop in.

This filter sits vertical close the firewall. Air through the snorkle gets pass through the filter into the box. Inside the box there is an intake arm with a velocity stack.

I want the response from a velocity stack (no filter style), but still wanted a filter and cold air from the outside.

here's a shot of the filter inplace, while I was still fabbing it up:

 

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I went through this scenario a few years back. Wanted the response from a short ram, but didn't want this heat. This is what I ended up with:



here's a good shot of the snorkle
Is this set-up considered cowl induction? http://www.team-integra.net/forum/14-performance/19943-cowl-induction-splitters-2.html I just got used to the hood being lifted on the back.


:edited:After some quick reading & looking at cowl induction hoods. I don't think your set-up is cowl induction, your appears to use a scoop that catch air where as in cowl induction an opening is made so that high pressure air pushes itself into a low pressure area. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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