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Hey guys Im going to pick up a new torque wrench this weekend so I can rotate my wheels and tires and torque the lugs down to spec. Also in a few Id like to be able to do my spark plugs and various other things. My question is what type and size should I get? Ive called and have been to napa, advance, autozone and so on. They have click type, beam type, 3/8, 1/2in and so on also in or foot measurement. Any help on what I should get would be great. The ones I have been lookin at are all around 30 dollars. Thanks in advance!

Dan
 

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For your wheels I would get a 1/2" drive, but for things such as spark plugs you will likely need a 3/8" drive for lighter torque settings. And I would definitely go for a click-type in a good brand name. I have nothing but good things to say about my Craftsman after 3+ years and two engine rebuilds.
 

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Go to a pawnshop and take a look at what they have. I got a badass wrench for less than half of what it cost at retail, 1/2" drive, clickity type. I'd get a 1/2"...you can always buy an adapter for a smaller size if you need to. No regrets.

oh...make sure that it goes down to as low as you need it...mine goes to 250 ft-lbs, but only goes down to about 20 (stops showing numbers at 40 ft-lbs.) Not sure what the torque specs for plugs are, but prolly less than that...
 

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I LOVE this set of Torque wrenches by CDI Torque Products, but if you want them be prepared to spend the cash.

1/2 inch drive

3/8 inch drive

1/4 inch drive

They are SO nice to use.
For the most part, however, a torque wrench that costs around 40$-60$ should be more than enough for most jobs you will do.
 

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soft_step on Sep/21/07 said:
.....I'd get a 1/2"...you can always buy an adapter for a smaller size if you need to......
adapters can throw off an accurate reading really easily.

FYI
 

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ah good to know. I never gave enough of a **** to consider that. Personally, I doubt I'd buy another wrench. only need an adapter when I have a rounded bolt., but good info nonetheless.
 

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You will want it in lb-ft (foot pounds) unless you're doing some real technical stuff, you'll never touch on inch pounds. And inch pounds are the type of torque you can do with your pinky finger, so thats precision stuff.

Honestly, though, for torquing lug nuts I would just make sure they are on there tight with a 1/2" drive ratchet. You won't overtorque them with your ratchet. Unless you plan on getting more in depth with motor work, you could spend your money elsewhere. A decent torque wrench will run you a pretty penny. Autozone brands are crap.


Remember not to treat your torque wrench like the rest of your tools, just as much as dropping it once can throw off its accuracy. It shouldnt the majority of the time, but thats not really something you can know for sure, so you'd have to replace it.
 

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Thrasher865 on Sep/21/07 said:
....Honestly, though, for torquing lug nuts I would just make sure they are on there tight with a 1/2" drive ratchet. You won't overtorque them with your ratchet....

You can cause damage and or warpage to both your rotors and wheels by just using a ratchet or breaker bar.
You really should make sure all lugs are tightened the same. It's the safest way to go.

Sorry for be so finniky on the particular thread......
 

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materiamage on Sep/21/07 said:
Quote: Thrasher865 on Sep/21/07 ....Honestly, though, for torquing lug nuts I would just make sure they are on there tight with a 1/2" drive ratchet. You won't overtorque them with your ratchet....


You can cause damage and or warpage to both your rotors and wheels by just using a ratchet or breaker bar.
You really should make sure all lugs are tightened the same. It's the safest way to go.

Sorry for be so finniky on the particular thread......
x2 All the lugs need to be tightened evenly, thats why you use a torque wrench.
 

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ComptegGSR on Sep/21/07 said:
I love my craftsman torque wrench. It's never failed me yet. I always torque my wheels to 90ft/lbs. Better safe than sorry.
im sure acura thought about safety when they determined the torque specs so i wouldnt over torque if i were you although 10lb isnt much for lug nuts.
 

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Get a 1/2" and then just get a female to male 1/2 - 3/8 adapter for it if you ever need to use 3/8.
 

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m_kluch on Sep/21/07 said:
Quote: ComptegGSR on Sep/21/07I love my craftsman torque wrench. It's never failed me yet. I always torque my wheels to 90ft/lbs. Better safe than sorry.

im sure acura thought about safety when they determined the torque specs so i wouldnt over torque if i were you although 10lb isnt much for lug nuts.
Yeah, I meant 80 not 90.
 

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GSR624 on Sep/21/07 said:
For your wheels I would get a 1/2" drive, but for things such as spark plugs you will likely need a 3/8" drive for lighter torque settings. And I would definitely go for a click-type in a good brand name. I have nothing but good things to say about my Craftsman after 3+ years and two engine rebuilds.
I agree you can't beat the price and quality of Craftsman.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I got a torque wrench from a store close by wasnt that expensive its click type 1/2 drive worked great. Used it for my rotation. I have directional tires so I just did one side at a time and cleaned the wheels and lugs thoroughly before replacing. I'll find the name of it later was really easy to use. Thanks for the help.

Dan
 

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Nearly every 1/2" click-style torque wrench is only accurate at 10% of it's total. If your wrench is rated to 250 ft/lbs, it's only going to be accurate from 25 ft/lbs and up so don't be fooled. Click-type wrenches are usually the most accurate but they're sensitive to rough handling and you have to pay to have them re-calibrated every so often (usually the instructions that come with the tool determine the interval between re-calibrations) and they tend to be more expensive. Beam-type wrenches on the other hand are much more simple to calibrate (you just bend the beam back to zero) and they can take abuse better than the click-style, though they tend to be less accurate. If all you're using the wrench for is your wheels, you can probably get away with a beam torque wrench, but if you figure you're going to use the wrench for other engine building duties where precision is necessary and you have the cash to buy it, get a click Craftsman 1/2" or even better, a Snap-on. I've had my Snap-on for 3 years, it's been calibrated once, I use it at least 20 times a day and when I got it calibrated it was still dead on accurate.
 
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