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so for a while now I've been wondering why my 1998 Integra ls isn't making as much power as it should. it will accelerate as it should but when you try to step on the gas the engine just shakes and sounds like its under a lot of pressure. did some researching and found out a clogged/broken catalytic converter can cause this.(also figured out that the dude who sold it to me probably ruined the piston rings or valve stem seals because it burns hella oil.) that would also explain the rattling noise in my exhaust from 3k-3.5k rpms. broken cat! obviously buying a new one would be ideal but what about gutting it? the exhaust would definitely get more airflow than im having now. any thoughts?
 

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Could you "gut" it? Sure. However, you're going to have a Check Engine Light, as the ECU will be reading inefficiency from the O2 sensors. In other words, the ECU will know that the catalytic converter isn't doing it's job, then throw a code, and put the vehicle in "limp" mode.
 

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Could you "gut" it? Sure. However, you're going to have a Check Engine Light, as the ECU will be reading inefficiency from the O2 sensors. In other words, the ECU will know that the catalytic converter isn't doing it's job, then throw a code, and put the vehicle in "limp" mode.
right but couldn't I just disable that check engine light? what's the difference between a gutted cat and a straight pipe?
 

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Disable? If it were that easy, wouldn't everyone just "disable" their check engine lights?

No difference really between the two. The people who modify with gutted cats and/or straight pipes are also individuals looking for a little more power, and are running aftermarket ECU's that are properly tuned.
 

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Disable? If it were that easy, wouldn't everyone just "disable" their check engine lights?

No difference really between the two. The people who modify with gutted cats and/or straight pipes are also individuals looking for a little more power, and are running aftermarket ECU's that are properly tuned.
im looking for the cheapest way to fix/ replace my broken cat without ****ing something up with an O2 sensor.
 

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If your car burns a lot of oil, then a new cat will be destroyed in under a year. So if you aren't going to fix the oil burning issues, then I suggest going obd1 with an obd2a-obd1 jumper harness and an obd1 P75 ECU. Then you can hollow out the cat, or cut it off and run a straight pipe, or whatever. That being said, excess oil in the combustion chamber will definitely lower the octane of your gas. So that could add to the power loss. I would run a relative compression test. Make sure the rings are good and that the valves aren't leaking. Leaky valves will really hinder performance. If your compression is good, then replace the valve stem seals and go obd1. If you have to do emissions testing, you can still go obd1. But before you test, get a new cat, replace the obd2 computer, then pass. Then put the old hollow cat & obd1 ECU back In. In this case a hollowed out cat would probably be easier. Because then you could take the new cat off after testing, and not ruin it with oil. And put the old hollow cat back on without fitment issues.
 

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If your car burns a lot of oil, then a new cat will be destroyed in under a year. So if you aren't going to fix the oil burning issues, then I suggest going obd1 with an obd2a-obd1 jumper harness and an obd1 P75 ECU. Then you can hollow out the cat, or cut it off and run a straight pipe, or whatever. That being said, excess oil in the combustion chamber will definitely lower the octane of your gas. So that could add to the power loss. I would run a relative compression test. Make sure the rings are good and that the valves aren't leaking. Leaky valves will really hinder performance. If your compression is good, then replace the valve stem seals and go obd1. If you have to do emissions testing, you can still go obd1. But before you test, get a new cat, replace the obd2 computer, then pass. Then put the old hollow cat & obd1 ECU back In. In this case a hollowed out cat would probably be easier. Because then you could take the new cat off after testing, and not ruin it with oil. And put the old hollow cat back on without fitment issues.
i got a question about what you said here, i have got a 1998 integra with a b18c, with a chipped p78, i have no cut and also have no engine light, is that something to do with that ecu? in canada anything 1995 and older didnt need a cat and the motor is from 95
 

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If you are running a chipped ECU, then it is an obd1 ECU. obd1 ecu's don't have a catalyst monitor. And only run an upstream oxygen sensor to monitor air/fuel mixtures. There is not an input in the ecu for a second oxygen sensor to monitor the catalyst.
 

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If your car burns a lot of oil, then a new cat will be destroyed in under a year.
Everyone says this, but it's not always true. My 98 GSR has burned a quart every 250-350 miles for years now, and the cat I installed in 2014 is still running strong and passing california emissions tests every two years.
 

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Well, I speak from experience. I've been a Honda specialist mechanic for over 20 years. If your Honda burns oil, it will eat the cat. However, the little atomization of oil that happens at high rpms, that vtec motors rev to, is not the same as burning oil. Using 1 quart every 1500-2000 miles is normal. And not considered "burning".

That's just what happens in an internal combustion engine that is oil lubricated. There will always be some oil consumed.

I guess it takes a moment to learn something. But anyone can get on here and spout their BS anecdotal horseshit.

No offense. But...

There are litterally dozens of places on a B18C engine where oil can seep or leak. And that is probably where your oil is going. On the ground. Not out your tail pipe.
 
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