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Discussion Starter #1
Hey my g/f's 97 Integra has rusted fuel/brake lines that run under the car and when I had the car off the ground today I noticed the fuel supply line was leaking. All five of the lines(3 fuel and 2 brake) are pretty rusted so I was wondering what I should do. The only rusted parts are the areas under that plastic shield that goes over the lines, the rest of the lines are perfectly fine. Getting a shop to replace them all is pretty much out of the question since it would easily cost $1000 for them to do it. A small independent shop that my family takes their cars to says he should be able to cut out the bad section and install copper lines in place. This method would probally cost me no more then $400. Has anyone ever had this done on their Integra? Do you think it would hold up alright? Any reason not to do it this way? I know it isn't the best way of doing it but if it lasts her another 4 or 5 years she would be happy. Any thoughts on this or ideas of what I should do? Please help me out!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well the only bad spots on mine is the section under the plastic shield and the lines are pretty much straight so I would think you could just cut the straight sections out and fit a new line. I'm just not sure if they would be able to connect the two in a way that would hold up to the pressure and last. Someone must have experience with this so please help me out.
 

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I had this done this summer. They just cut out the rusted part and spliced in rubber tubing. It was good for a while but then it started to slowy slowly leak again. I sealed it up with urethane sealant about a month ago and its been good since. It will have be redone though. Have the line replaced or do it yourself, otherwise youll waste your money having to repair it over and over, not to mention the spilled gas.


Edit: After re-reading your post, both quotes are kinda high. I was quoted 400 to replace both entire fuel lines.
 

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I bought my Teg with this exact problem and fixed it myself. The fuel lines are pretty easy to repair - cut out the bad section (I cut about 4 feet) and replace it. I did this by buying new steel lines the same size as the originals, using a 6 inch piece of rubber fuel line to join the new lines to the old ones and by using 2 gear clamps on either side of each rubber piece. The brake lines are a little more difficult but if you can flare a brake line you can easily repair the lines. Measure how long a piece you plan to cut out, either buy a precut and flared line or cut and flare your own, buy 4 brake line junctions, flare the ends of the original lines (the ones still on the car), thread the junctions onto the lines you flared on the car, mount the new lines into the junctions, tighten them all down tight and you're ready to bleed the brakes. Some things to remember: use a pipe cutter to cut the lines - not wire cutters etc, have something to catch the fuel and brake fluid. I didn't bother to bleed off the fuel pressure in the lines - there was only a small squirt of gas when I started cutting the main fuel line but it kept running out until I plugged the line, take the time to practice your brake line flaring before you're ready to do the repair - it takes practice to do it right. Be sure to totally bleed the brakes when you're done. Also make sure that you have the line nuts (you'll need 2 per line) on the brake lines before you flare them - the flare nuts are the pieces that will thread into the junctions and compress the flares for a tight hydraulic seal. Its probably best to repair the brake lines in their entirety, but I needed my car back on the road so I did it this way. If you're not comfortable with the brake line work take it to a pro, but the fuel lines are super easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I'm pretty sure you can't do the fuel supply line as you described Shawn due to the fact that the supply line is under high pressure. I know the return and vent line can be fixed by replacing it with a rubber line but I'm most concerned about the supply line. My mechanic said he could replace the bad part with a copper line and I would assume he would be using some time of pressure fitting. I would just like to know peoples thoughts on replacing the pressurized line with a copper one.
 

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Trust me, you can do the higher pressure line without bleeding with the car off - I did it. There's pressure in that line but as soon as the line is opened to the atmosphere that pressure dissipates until the car is started and the fuel pump works to re-pressureize the line again. Copper line would work fine as a replacement for either of the fuel lines, though in my case I used double walled steel line like the brake system uses. You can use a different type of fitting for those fuel lines but the fuel pressure in those lines isn't that high - I repaired mine as I described - about 15000 kms ago with no leaks or swelling at all. The trick is to use a rubber fuel line that's made for an EFI system, not just a random rubber line to join the new lines to the old ones. In any case its your decision, but total cost of parts was about $50 including rubber lines, new steel lines and clamps + about 2.5 hours of my time - not a bad deal.
 

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you can just do what my1999gsr said but without the rubber line. just put a union in them. just like brake lines this is a very easy thing to do. and i would bleed the pressure at the fuel filter because there is pressure in the lines and i personally don't like taking gas bath's. the pressure does eventually fade but not completely. the way you know this is you don't have the crank the sh** out of your car to get it to start right? so therefor is is some pressure in those lines.

remember do things right the first time and then you don't have to worry about it 5k down the road and you can concentrait on other things that you may need to fix and not end up doing things over and over again
 

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if i were you i would use oem replacement lines rather than splicing fragments of line in. the replacement for all the lines should cost around 250 for everything. i had the exact same issue a few weeks ago. you can also bend and flare your own replacement lines out of stainless line but i would really stay away from splicing new segments in, regardless of anyone else's success stories.

just think theres a higher risk of those spliced fragments failing then there is a whole new line failing. if your mechanically inclined this whole thing should take around 7 hours to do since the subframe needs to come down
 

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same problem

I'm in the mist of doing this to my car but the lines are rusted all the way up and over the sub frame. I can cut and disconnect them from the back and use joints like u do on brake lines but have no idea how to get to the other end fixed.
 

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You can only use rubber tubing for splicing into the fuel return. Both the fuel feed and brake lines are under high pressure.

Double flaring (which is what type of flares on the integra) are fairly difficult to do if you arent used to doing them or dont have a good flaring tool. The other thing is if you plan on taking the plastic guard off under the car, plan on replacing all the lines because when removing the guard i can guarantee you will break other lines. Id recommend buying either oem lines or splicing them with pre-flared sections from napa etc..
 

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The other thing is if you plan on taking the plastic guard off under the car, plan on replacing all the lines because when removing the guard i can guarantee you will break other lines.
You must be very gentle and support the other lines while removing the guard. I have successfully removed mine before. I noticed the rust forming and sanded down the lines in this area. Applied a rust inhibitor and then painted the lines. That was about 2 years ago when I lived in NE Indiana, still holding up, but I should take a look at them before its Dragon time.
 

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where to buy yhe lines

Any idea where to buy the fuel lines? I found them in one place for @$102 BUT they want $364 to ship. that isnt happening...thanks for any info...
 
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