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Discussion Starter #1
My final project for Engine Repair class is about electric cars, so that got me thinking. I was just wondering whether anyone has ever put some thought into building an electric Integra. I mean obviously, yes, because the following cars exist...

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http://www.youtube.com/v/Y2UfTd3eXtE?fs=1&hl=en_US













Vehicle: 1990 Acura Integra. Just your run of the mill Integra
Motor: General Electric Series Wound DC
Drivetrain:9" GE motor from blackdogfx.com
Controller: Curtis 1231-8602c 500amp
Batteries: 12 Odyssey PC1500T, 12.00 Volt, Lead-Acid, AGM
System Voltage: 144 Volts
Charger: ProMariner promite
4 chargers that charge 3 batteries per charger
Heater: ceramic
DC/DC Converter: Iota dsl55 55 amp model #?
Instrumentation: Xantex Link 10
Top Speed: 95 MPH (152 KPH)
This car is fast
Acceleration: 0-60 in 5 sec on a full charge, but if you do that all the time then the batts last about 15 miles
Range: 30 Miles (48 Kilometers)
Seating Capacity: 5 adults
Curb Weight: 3,100 Pounds (1,409 Kilograms)
Conversion Time: just started 3-22-08, finished 6-25-08
Conversion Cost: 19,500

Electegra

[Where did Electra II go?]

Electegra III

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It's also interesting to look at the two Electegras and note what was done differently in the second iteration. I have always been a lover of the Integras with a little extra weight on them, so to find a pair of electric Integra sedans was fascinating and inspiring. In the commentary for the Electegra III, it says that 80% of the trunk space was retained!

Like I said earlier, I was wondering whether anyone else had thought about what it would entail to build an electric Integra. I'm interested in hearing thoughts from others on this topic. I know of two completed electric Integras, and an electric Civic Wagon, so I know that we will see more of these as time goes on. Besides, it looks like a fun alternative to going K.
 

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Me and the guys in the car club at my school here are going to build an electric autoX car. Its going to be an E30 though =/

What kind of transmission does this car use?
 

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Discussion Starter #4


From what I've gathered, it's the rebuilt stock cable transmission with an adapter plate for the 9" DC motor.
 

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Interesting, but definitely throw in a Tesla electric engine in there!!! I've heard there are companies out there in the US that perform EV conversion with other cars. I also saw someone from ecomodder.com (not sure if it was from that site, was a while ago) he converted his car into EV and using under-body aerodynamic to vent/cool his batteries. He had to custom fab the complete trunk floor and had professional welded into his car too.
 

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i'm not sold on electricity to power solely power any vehicle.

self propelling magnets to run an alternator to charge my car would be the only route i'd go, and i wouldn't have lead acid as the storage unit of the electricity either.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I really can't say that I go more than 30 miles on most days. It would be a great city car.
 

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Is very feasable pretty much on any car. Technically we could replace the entire fuel tank and secure a battery tray in the place of the tank... just that alone plus the trunk floor, probably has more than enough juice to roll 30 miles+. But of course, using lead acid battery is a bad idea if they really want to make a good EV car.
 

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I think people are missing the point. The idea here is that someone fully converted a gas-powered car to electric. Also, the cost of re-charging after 20-30 miles is way less than the cost of gas and in places like CA that power can be gotten from solar, nuclear, and wind power (which you can install towers for in your own home). Basically it works out to be MUCH less expensive over the long run, much less polution, and i'd love to have an electric car for my 7-mile daily commute to save me the wear and tear on my 'weekend car'. Jay Leno said it best on season 12 of top gear when they reviewed the Honda FCX Clarity: "This is going to save the gas powered car much like the gas powered car saved the horse."
 

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There are really 2 killers that have existed for electric cars...Batteries and DC electric motors. Travis has really nailed the battery part, but the other part that stood in the way for quite some time is the DC motor. With a DC motor, the horsepower is constant meaning the torque is a linear downward slope...

It's nice for starting out, but there is no top end power!

Since AC motors have come along, things have been a lot nicer since they have the nice advantage of having torque higher in their operational speed.


The other not really thought about part with plug in EV's is what happens to the power companies? Power engineers have designed the transformers out on the streets to technically operate slightly above their rated load and therefore heat up during the day when demand is high.Running them a bit above their rated load creates less losses within the transformer and more power is transferred to the end user.At night, demand is low giving the transformers a chance to cool down. If demand is high in the day, and when people get home they plug in their vehicles, the demand remains high. With the higher demand, the transformers can't cool down and poof there they go. This requires the power company to install higher rated transformers...passing the cost of this to the customer, which in turn lowers the power factor meaning the company must supply more rated power to the customer which the customer never gets...also raising the cost per kWh...

If you need any help with anything, let me know...I did a sustainment porject last term on switching the campus over to electric utility vehicles vs the current ones.
 

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The college I attend covered the main parking lot at the campus with a solar panel system which is feeding the school and keeping the vehicles protected from the hot sun rays. It is also outfitted for future "vehicle outlets" to recharge your electric car. The argument here is: Is it more efficient to have a massive eco-friendly (electric) public transportation or outfit every daily commuter with electric vehicles? Either way Edison, PG&E, and so on claim that the demand for electrical output to the individual with electric vechicles and public electric transport will be almost the same.
When and if the state of California mandates a conversion to electric transport then I hope this will ease smog requirements, meaning not became MORE restrictive than it already is. S.E.M.A. has lobbyist in Washington DC voting and helping auto enthusiast like us to keep our hobby alive, legal, and active. The idea of driving a electric car to work is awesome but I would convert an old Volkswagen Bug: light weight, trans-rear wheel drive (good torque), the battery is already stored under the back seat, and easy to work on. on the weekends drive my gas powered sports car or my Integra. The electric Integra is over weight and defeats the purpose of the economical sports car it was born to be. However, now I know that a electric Integra does exist, which is impressive.
 

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Ty
Its been 7 years since i built this vehicle
Im now working on a full aluminum vehicle that will be 1800 lbs total weight
and will get 200 mile range with the new batteries
and quick charger

Beny
 

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My final project for Engine Repair class is about electric cars, so that got me thinking. I was just wondering whether anyone has ever put some thought into building an electric Integra. I mean obviously, yes, because the following cars exist...

-----
















Vehicle: 1990 Acura Integra. Just your run of the mill Integra
Motor: General Electric Series Wound DC
Drivetrain:9" GE motor from blackdogfx.com
Controller: Curtis 1231-8602c 500amp
Batteries: 12 Odyssey PC1500T, 12.00 Volt, Lead-Acid, AGM
System Voltage: 144 Volts
Charger: ProMariner promite
4 chargers that charge 3 batteries per charger
Heater: ceramic
DC/DC Converter: Iota dsl55 55 amp model #?
Instrumentation: Xantex Link 10
Top Speed: 95 MPH (152 KPH)
This car is fast
Acceleration: 0-60 in 5 sec on a full charge, but if you do that all the time then the batts last about 15 miles
Range: 30 Miles (48 Kilometers)
Seating Capacity: 5 adults
Curb Weight: 3,100 Pounds (1,409 Kilograms)
Conversion Time: just started 3-22-08, finished 6-25-08
Conversion Cost: 19,500

Electegra

[Where did Electra II go?]

Electegra III

-----

It's also interesting to look at the two Electegras and note what was done differently in the second iteration. I have always been a lover of the Integras with a little extra weight on them, so to find a pair of electric Integra sedans was fascinating and inspiring. In the commentary for the Electegra III, it says that 80% of the trunk space was retained!

Like I said earlier, I was wondering whether anyone else had thought about what it would entail to build an electric Integra. I'm interested in hearing thoughts from others on this topic. I know of two completed electric Integras, and an electric Civic Wagon, so I know that we will see more of these as time goes on. Besides, it looks like a fun alternative to going K.
That car was my build
to all the lead acid battery haters, when I built the car lithium was a very very expensive choice, and not to mention not proven to be very safe
so I went with a battery that was easy to get and easy to replace once LiPo was here, like it is now.
If I would build this car again, I would use a 3 phase motor and some better batts.
 

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My final project for Engine Repair class is about electric cars, so that got me thinking. I was just wondering whether anyone has ever put some thought into building an electric Integra. I mean obviously, yes, because the following cars exist...

-----
















Vehicle: 1990 Acura Integra. Just your run of the mill Integra
Motor: General Electric Series Wound DC
Drivetrain:9" GE motor from blackdogfx.com
Controller: Curtis 1231-8602c 500amp
Batteries: 12 Odyssey PC1500T, 12.00 Volt, Lead-Acid, AGM
System Voltage: 144 Volts
Charger: ProMariner promite
4 chargers that charge 3 batteries per charger
Heater: ceramic
DC/DC Converter: Iota dsl55 55 amp model #?
Instrumentation: Xantex Link 10
Top Speed: 95 MPH (152 KPH)
This car is fast
Acceleration: 0-60 in 5 sec on a full charge, but if you do that all the time then the batts last about 15 miles
Range: 30 Miles (48 Kilometers)
Seating Capacity: 5 adults
Curb Weight: 3,100 Pounds (1,409 Kilograms)
Conversion Time: just started 3-22-08, finished 6-25-08
Conversion Cost: 19,500

Electegra

[Where did Electra II go?]

Electegra III

-----

It's also interesting to look at the two Electegras and note what was done differently in the second iteration. I have always been a lover of the Integras with a little extra weight on them, so to find a pair of electric Integra sedans was fascinating and inspiring. In the commentary for the Electegra III, it says that 80% of the trunk space was retained!

Like I said earlier, I was wondering whether anyone else had thought about what it would entail to build an electric Integra. I'm interested in hearing thoughts from others on this topic. I know of two completed electric Integras, and an electric Civic Wagon, so I know that we will see more of these as time goes on. Besides, it looks like a fun alternative to going K.
I built the two integras
you better have access to a lathe and mill and a car lift, and a good tig welder
and about 1 month of free time
oh and $25K
 
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