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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, I need some advice here and maybe some help. My cousin and I are going to be working on his '98 GSR sometime in the near future when he gets his Skunk2 Cams and Valve Springs, and Spoon 2-piece head gasket. We were figuring that since we will have to take the head off, why not port and polish it. We are thinking on doing it by hand, so I'd like to know what are the pros and cons to doing this. Obviously, you save a grip of money, but what are the dangers? And also, if you know of any good "do-it-yourself" sites that could aid us, please post a link. I would greatly appreciate all the help and info you guys can give us.
 

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i believe this is better off left to professionals....especially if this is your first time
 

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I was thinking about doing it also on my ls...and I have an extra head to do this with...the big problem is that if you take off too much you may reduce the velocity of the air entering and this will bog you down till you reach high rpms...pretty much...do your research and then decide if you can do it...you can also just clean out all the ports and do a rough polish...that will help out flow without risk...be carefull though aluminum is somewhat soft


good luck with whatever you do
 

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ya i just cleaned it out and polished any rough spots (ok i polished a lot). thatll take some time in itself anyways. its realll dingy in there
 

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Hey man! I just got done doing the whole thing myself....ripped off the head, and did a cleaning job, and I polished up all the cast and made it nice a smooth!! Your cousin should save the money on the spoon 2 piece head gasket and get a OEM and take one of the layers off.....get a fuel rail with the money saved :)
cya
 

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if you take off the wrong area or too much you'll gut your midrange.

have you read my article of headporting called "Gotten Head Lately?" over at Hondavision.com? It's in the Tech Review Articles section. Read the links in it and the entire thread. Then get back to me on any questions.

What cartridge roll are you using?

Get a manifold gasket. That should give you the limits to how much to take off. There are certain casting imperfections in the port that should not be smoothed out or cleaned up.

talk to you soon,....
 

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I hope you have before and after dynos of your work dude, not to mention the ability to read your AFR per RPM...

 

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Discussion Starter #10
What other things do you guys recommend doing when we take off the head? What parts should we add, replace, etc.

What's a manifold gasket...how much is it?

And what's a cartridge roll?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Also, I forgot to ask....what tools are necessary to take the head off and all the other extra work (new cams, valve springs, etc) and where can I get them for cheap?
 

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Yeah, if you do it yourself... use a performance gasket and outline or trace... if you go past the trace, you can cause thermal damage and cracks that would be barely visable if you take off too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hey MD, I think the Do It Yourself Porting is out of the question, but cleaning it up may be what we are going to do. I have a few questions though about polishing...

1. What tools do you suggest on using for cleaning it up until he gets a port job and where to get these tools?
2. What would be some good companies to take the head for a port job? My cousin and I are from So. Cal in LA, and I live right by Torrance, so what shops there would you recommend? How about in the Pacific Northwest since that is where we currently reside for school?
3. In getting a Manifold Gasket, do you mean an OEM Honda one?
4. What's a Cartridge Roll?
5. What would you suggest we do once we remove the head...as in replacing parts, cleaning things up, etc.?

Thanks for your help MD, it's greatly appreciated.
 

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Down here in SoCal, Portflow is really good when talking about cylinder head jobs. You really have tons of options around here.
 

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I am also in need of some help in this area , as I am finally in the money range I need to be in. Come on man , us guys stuck up here in Oregon have to work harder because we are few and far between.
 

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well there isn't too much out there that I am aware of regarding the RSX Type S or B18A headporting in terms of articles.

there' lots on the ITR, B16a, and GSR heads.

are you looking for info on DIY headporting or are you looking to send your cylinder head to have a shop do it for you?

here is a link to some stock head flow numbers for an RSX and headporting for a b16a which can be used to help guide your b18a headporting in terms of what to target with a grinder and cartridge roll.

http://alaniztechnologies.com/rsxf20c1flowcahrt.html


http://www.theoldone.com/articles/b16a_head/


for basic info:

http://www.sa-motorsports.com/diyport.htm

http://www.alaniztechnologies.com/headterms.html


some recent headporting info from Endyn on DIY headporting:

[i said:
Originally posted by Larry Widmer at Endyn on Mar/2003 [/i]]
When I rework a head, the first step is making sure the valve guides are acceptable. If they're not, we heat the head and freeze new guides, for installation, followed by reaming and honing to the correct clearances.

Step two is milling the deck of the head parallel with the cam bores.

This generally requires no more than a couple thousandths materail removal, unless the head's been butchered by another machine shop... or drastically overheated.

Step three is machining the seats to their finished diameters. I machine all the intake seats to the same depth relative to the head's deck surface. Same with the exhaust seats. The depths of the seats respectively is determined by the camshafts we'll be using, as in many instances the cams are so wild that we have to position the seat heights to make the valves "miss" each other at overlap....scary right?

After machining the seats, I use some cutters in the Serdi machine to open the area around the valve seat for additional breathing space. on some applications, the vertical portion of the cutter will actually extend to the bore diameter, helping define the chamber shape.

I machine valves, which are the same sizes as those to be used in the head, so there is "zero" margin. I use these valves to protect the seat proper from abuse.

on the inside portion of the seat, I blend the short angle defining the ID of the seat proper by hand into a variable radius extending into the port bowl. The radius us very large on the long wall side, and small on the short-turn side. I use carbide to do all the shaping (with that great-big Dumore grinder) on all these "tedius" areas, and come back using 60 grit to finish it. There's very little material removal that I do with the cartridge rolls, as they flex a lot and aren't good for transitioning aluminum to steel.




Here's a shot of the machined seats and the areas I machine in the chamber prior to porting.


[br]

Here's the chamber where I've "connected the points" with a 5 flute carbide alumicut burr.


[br]

Some careful cartridge rolling with 60 grit...





Here's what the bowls and the inside of the valve seats look like when I rough them out. Note that I grind with carbide right up to the inside of the seat proper, giving it the shape it needs...but I don't touch the seats...



In this pic, note that I've shaped the valve guides and done more extensive work in the bowl area.

This head is for an engine that will be identical to the 2-liter combination in my ITR, except it's an all-out NA combination with 15.7-1 CR.

I should note that on B16, and all other heads with indented quench pads, we use a CNC machining operation for finalizing the quench pad depths and roughing out the entire chamber. on a large bore GSR combination like this, it's actually easier to "connect the dots" by hand.

When I'm done, all the chambers will be within .1cc on their first measurement, so there's very little correction from chamber to chamber that's necessary.

and my headporting article over at hondavision.com (56k users be patient) and valve seat angle article here:

http://www.hondavision.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5525&pagenumber=1

http://www.team-integra.net/sections/articles/showArticle.asp?ArticleID=353

happy reading to self-educate yourself...

cheers
 

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Porting is out... Polishing the runners and matching the intake and exhaust is something that i am going to try here real soon... I just picked up the kit today that included a lot of straight and tapered rolls in diffrent grits. So wish me luck! :)
 

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keep the intake port rougher than the exhaust...if the intake port surface is mirror smooth, you'll actually create more unwanted turbulence and fuel separation. It's okay to have a more polished surface on the exhaust side with the higher heat on that side. the exhaust carbon usually covers that side anyway.

Alaniz uses at most a 40-60 grit cartridge roll on the intake and 120 grit on the exhaust side. He uses a coarse double cut burr that's well lubricated to port with because it doesn't clog up like a cutter. Endyn uses a 80 grit on the bowl approach to the seat but uses a 60 grit on the intake port runner or inlet finish. What is the port bowl? Most of the intake side porting is done from the chamber side into an area that they call "the bowl" of the port...which is the portion above the valve seat that extends up to the valve guide as the "roof" and includes the short turn radius as the "floor" of the bowl...this is done with the head off.

Combustion Chamber side View of Intake Port on a ported 1.8L N/A B18C5 :



Same view for a ported PR3 head made for a 2.2L B20:




Some people just clean up on the IM side or "flange view" but the big gains from porting are at the seat angles and bowl area approaching the top cut seat angle ....not at the entry of the intake port (or the IM side view of the intake port).

on the flange view of the intake port, people are advised to clean up the opening by removing any casting shifts (flaws in the sand casting process for making cylinder heads) and then widen the floor at the corners of the short turn radius to gain some midlift flow. The bowl divider in between the 2 valves is narrowed but made into a rounded or tear dropped shape( rather than sharp one) on the leading edge to prevent shearing or flow-fuel separation (ever look at the intake opening of a MIG 15 jet that has a similar divider to prevent turbulence at Mach speeds ?).

B18C5 N/A IM Side View of Port for a 1.8L:



B18C1 N/A IM side View of Port for a 2L (injector boss or slot on top of the port was filled in):




Endyn advises that the intake port be : "a tiny bit larger than the manifold exit (anti-reversion), and it should effectively capture the mixture and straighten it so we may manipulate it down stream. The intake port should never be in line with the cylinder bore axis, or there will be little quality mixture turbulence, which is a necessity."


Endyn also advises:

"Start by assuming that the manifold runner is a portion of the port and the combination is designed to deliver a well-prepared mixture to the port and cylinder. When designing the intake port / manifold runner, the measurement of the length of the roof should equal the length of the runner and port floor (including the short turn radius). This provides equal surface friction for the length of the port and will help keep the mixture intact by reducing the tendency to shear the flow. The texture of the intake runner and port should be consistently coarse to prevent boundary layer build up and the resultant tendency to develop surface tension and subsequent fuel attachment.The intake port throat should expand in area slightly during the short turn radius section (regardless of height) to lower velocities and increase pressure providing the necessary (flow energy (or momentum) to enhance the mixture transition through the seat region and on into the cylinder.... This is all in an effort to create equal roof and floor lengths."

Most of you will just clean up the core casting shift lines or flaws in the runner area closer to the IM and widen the corners of the short turn radius and that's about it. Few inexperienced people will venture into more "risky territory" like the bowl or around the valve guides to taper them.

Both Alaniz and Endyn agree that you should not go too "grinder happy" in eliminating all the casting core shift lines you see in the intake port, particularly the "underhangs" just above the top cut angle/seat, since they actually help induce swirl.

Endyn: "It should be pointed out that heads vary from casting to casting. In this view of the customer head, the exhaust port "underhangs" are visible, as are the slight indentions beneath the valve seats in the intake port bowls. While it may be tempting to do that last little swipe with a cartridge roll to eliminate the "flaws", don't do it. I need to point out that areas like these are frequently different from port to port in the same head, so don't be fooled. The amount of shift can frequently grow, as you move from one end of the head to another."

BASIC RULES: don't take much off...just clean up the port runners...keep the intake port surface rough.
 
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