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Discussion Starter #1
well today i hit a huge puddle didnt know it was so big car died. now starter just clicks and lights dim like it cant turn the motor over. tried popping the clutch to start it but the tires wont even turn just skid what will it take to fix it??????????????can i do it or take it to a shop???please help!!
 

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if you do try starting it again you could do more damage.
But if you do want to try starting it again remove the spark plugs and see if anything comes out.
 

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Give it a day or so to 'dry out'. It's possible you splashed water up onto a belt and caused it to slip.

This is what hydrolock is:

Hydrostatic lock, hydraulic lock or hydrolock occurs when liquids, typically water, enter an engine cylinder. This can occur from a coolant, oil or fuel leak, but the chief cause is drawing water into the engine through the air induction system (airbox & filter, ducting, throttle body or carburetor, intake manifold). Internal combustion engines (spark or compression ignition) operating on a two-stroke or four-stroke cycle must employ a compression stroke to compress the charge (usually an air/fuel mixture). Liquids are incompressible; the presence of a liquid in the engine cylinder during the compression stroke generates destructively high cylinder pressures.

Abnormally high cylinder pressures can bend and break pistons, piston pins, connecting rods, crankshafts and ruin bearings and can crack or break cylinder heads and engine blocks. Small amounts of liquids may pass through an engine cycle without damage, but volumes exceeding 40cc (1.4 fluid ounces, <3 tablespoons) will cause many engines to develop cylinder pressures well in excess of 1000psi. A larger volume of water, up to the combustion chamber volume (usually 60cc to 100cc), will generate increasingly high cylinder pressure during the completion of the compression stroke. Volumes of water which exceed the combustion chamber volume will "stop" a running engine through true hydrostatic lock. Something expensive always bends or breaks when this happens.

Hydrolock may occur while the engine is running, the work of the compression stroke being supplied by engine's rotational inertia. Or a liquid may leak into the cylinder while the engine is being stored; the work of the compression stroke will be supplied by the starter motor.

Hydrolock is not a new problem, but it only affected certain applications. Older American made cars, particularly with V-configuration engines, often employed an air intake location which was high in the engine compartment. Because of the reduced tendency of these older American cars to hydrolock, it has not been in the forefront of design consideration and is not a household term.

Most newer, fuel injected cars have the air intake located low in the engine compartment. The objective of this low air intake is to draw cool air into the engine. Unfortunately, when driving through sufficiently deep standing or splashing water, engine vacuum from the intake stroke will suck water into the engine, particularly if the intake is submerged.

The cost to repair hydrolock damage begins at about $1000.00, and only goes sky high from there. Repair bills in excess of $35,000 have been reported in high-end passenger cars. Racing engines can cost twice that amount. Many new cars have been recognized as having poor designs to prevent hydrolock. Even some Four-Wheel-Drive pickup trucks and SUV's have been identified as having particularly high incidence rates of hydrolock. Manufacturers' warranties do not cover hydrolock engine damage, stating that the cause of operator error. one SUV manufacturer states the maximum vehicle speed through standing water to be 5 mph; hydrolock occurring at speeds in excess of 5 mph is judged to be operator error. The repair may be covered by a vehicle's Collision/Comprehensive insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well i took out the sparkplugs annd used a shop vac to suck like 4-6 ounces of water out of the cylinders!!!!!
then i tried to start it turned like once then made the awefullest grinding noise OUCH!!!!
sound expensive?
 

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Call your insurance agent ASAP!
 

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IG4, that sounds god awful :(
Hopefully you have full comprehensive insurance. And if you do, put the OEM air filter box back on your car before an agent checks out the damage. By the way, did an AEM CIA cause the problem?
 

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yes definitely do what roundle says! it could be a lot of green and they could wiggle out of it if your "aftermarket" parts disqualifies your insurance!
let me put in some more exclamation points!!!!!!!!
 

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ouch.. yea call your insurance agency... have them right you a check for the amount and build a LS/VTEC monster or CRVTEC... LOL there is a light at the end of the tunnel
 

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That's a tough break IG4. Hopefully the insurance will cover it and you can get some money to make your teg better. Let us know what happens with that.
 

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Okay I checked all the hydrolock threads and most of the people were able to start back up after a dry out. I apparently hydroed yesterday and haven't really tried to restart since then. In fact none of my lights in the dash come on but the dome light, hazard, radio, and alarm work fine. Pulled the plugs and they are bone dry but the intake tract has small pool of water in it meaning the water got up the extention tube, pass my UNDERHOOD filter and into the intake all while rolling into a gas station with my foot on the brake. I am too scared to try to crank it up again. I guess my question since alot of the post said trying cranking the car and blasting the water out of the sparkplug seats and I had no water in there is there even a chance I might luck out. Please don't lock me out this time. I followed the rules and posted in a old post.
 

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You're probably right the only thing is half the people say crank it back up. The other half say don't even touch it again. I tried to crank it back up once after i had rolled out of the puddle and it did not turn over barely made an effort and didn't even sound like the engine turned. May have still been to damp (the filter).
 

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going to revive this thread again rather than post a new one since i dont think this is of enough signifigance to start a new post.
well, my motor was hydrolocked a few weeks ago. i actually was able to get my insurance to cover it. i got a new (used) motor dropped in at my semi-local honda dealer. i had to get another B18B because insurance wouldnt put anything else in. heres an example of what damage hydrolocking can cause:
"customer states vehicle was driven into water, possible engine damage. visable oil leak at delivery. found engine hydrolocked and broke #4 rod and busted engine block and cut holes in cylinder wall and oil pan" ended up costing the insurance company $2500 and me $36 heh.
just thought that someone might find this informative if theyre ever in this situation. ;)
 
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