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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
Yesterday I was asking for help so that I could verify if my springs are really eibach pro kit for tegs I just found out my springs are REAL eibach pro kit made for Integras 94-01. Another member "Hasboro" who happens to have them off the car (he's selling them) and he checked for me and we had identical numbers both top and bottom numbers so I'm assured that they're correct springs.
NowI need to find out how much to cut my bump stops. I read on on a post by our MOD Tony and he said cut them 30mm in the front and don't cut them in the back. I jsut want to double check on this, if anyone has any info it'd be great help, thanks guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
StyleTEG on Feb/05/04 said:
The pro kit is a tiny drop, you should not have any problems bottoming out.

I am dropped 2.3", and don't bottom out.
awesome! Thanks
less problem for me to worry about. I bought the pro kit used with 1000 miles on them for only $70 pick up so they of course did not come with new bump stops. I am kind of scared to cut my stock bump stops too.
 

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30mm in front will help the ride, the front easily hits the bump stops on ruffer roads. call eibach, they will tell you just that.
It will make it worse, and its bad for the shocks.

The bumpstop is essentially a VERY high progressive rate spring. The first section is the soft section, so gently touching it will stop the shock from being slammed. The second section, the part you are keeping, is extremely hard (basicly a last case situation, barely better than running with out a bumpstop). With out the first section to slow down the travel, you are just going to hit the near uncompressable section harder.
 

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wenlyone on Feb/06/04 said:
Ross, VERY high progressive rate spring? Try not to generalize. You are a mod, try to give out correct info.

909.256.8300

talk to them then come back and explain this again.
It is high progressive spring rate, bumpstop itself has a fix "spring rate"... and since the bumpstop is not one straight piece of rubber, but more like a few stage rubber, it gives it the characteristic of "progressive" spring rate...

ex: beginning gives say 600lb/ft then when it reach the lower part of the rubber, it gives like maybe 1000lb/ft... that's like progressive. numbers are just for an example tho.
 

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Thank you Codenamezero, that is exactly what I ment.

Our progressive rate springs (actual) are far from what I would call TRUE progressive rate springs. They are more a dual rate spring. The bumpstop is the exact same.

Do I know exactly what spring rates the bump stop would be? No. Do I know they are essential for proper shock life? Yes.

Eibach could say that you should run with out a bump stop, it doesn't mean they are right. Everywhere i have read says that it is better to keep the soft end of the bumpstop and hit it more often than to cut it. The pro kit especially (which I used to have). Which does not lower enough to require cutting of the bumpstop. When measuring my suspension travel, I never found that I had hit the bumpstop.
 

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there is a reason why eibach made their name on the pro kit... but then again, what do they know.

the shock travel of 30mm doesn't have much to do with shock life. controlling the spring uncompression of the progressive spring rate to a stop is what kills shocks. any lower springs you get will shorten your shock life, just because the stock shocks are not meant for high progressive spring rates carried by all lowering springs. bump stop progressive spring rate dual stage spring rate? you guys need to stop dreaming... hard rubber with rings around it doesn't make it progressive nor dual stage... all it does is prevent it from uneven rebound distribution.

I expect more from mods. Why don't you guys research, find some numbers, talk to some engineers, and come back to enlighten this gentalmen.

eibach engineer research or StyleTEG's opinion, your choice.

let's goto the basics. 3 types of springs: Normal (Linear), Step Linear, and Progressive.

1. Linear springs have equally spaced coils which every coil compressed is added on top of the previous rate.

2. Step linear springs, or what you call 2 step linear springs. it is just as it sounds. half of the spring have a set spacing, and the other half have another. The first step is always softer, while second step is usually 2 times the rate. what is this good for? coil overs.

3. Progressive springs, rising rate springs, progressive rate springs, progressive wound springs, what ever you see on this list is the same. this type of spring each coil is spaced differently, but progressively. the rate increases as every coil is compressed.

so, what is the reason to cut bumpstops? first, what are bump stops? bump stop is just a piece of rubber that stops the shocks to compress more than a certain length. why? so suspension parts won't get in contact with the body. but how does that effect your ride. well... if the suspension traveling speed coming up when you hit a bump is still accelerating, and before the spring rate can match that travel you hit the bumps stop, you will feel that sudden stop of the travel. that is where you feel the harsh, boom.

time for you guys to do some suspension reading. if your area has no potholes, then even without cutting, you will be fine.

mods, shape up.
 
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