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Earlier today I replaced the distributor cap and rotor, then I went for a drive and discovered that when I stop moving my car leaks coolant and heats up very quickly. I think it is coolant because it is green. When I look under my car it looks like the leak is coming from under the engine before the cat. I popped the hood and the coolant reservoir is very bubbly, I assume this is because the engine was just running. I took the car home and now I am afraid to drive it and cause more damage.
 

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Ultimately, you have a coolant leak. I would recommend topping off your coolant in the radiator, along with the coolant reservoir, and run the engine stationary so that you can see where it might be leaking from.
 

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Yes, coolant is green (or possibly indigo blue if you make the epic mistake of putting Subaru coolant in). jjkz24 is spot on about running the car in-place and checking for leaks. A bright flashlight, a telescopic mirror, and a jug of 50/50 Prestone will make this possible. A Lisle Coolant Funnel will also help here because it allows you to "overfill" your radiator so you can let the test run longer. Fill the radiator and "Max" the reservoir before beginning, but DO NOT open the radiator cap while the car is running or while the coolant is hot--it will spray you with scalding hot water.

Common places to leak coolant:
  • Top edge of radiator (replace cracked radiator)
  • Water pump (replace water pump gasket or pump and gasket if pump impeller is anything but smooth & quiet)
  • Heater hose connections under distributor (replace hardened/ leaking hoses)
  • Thermostat Housing (replace thermostat gasket AND thermostat if it's been more than 3 years since last replacement)
  • Heater Core (stock heater cores should all be replaced by now b/c they are all corroded and either are leaking or will soon leak--Honda OEM used dissililar metals [brass, copper, tin, & steel] which have been corroding since day 1). Thanks @Silvia for reminding me about this one.
  • Head gasket (you can smell it by your tail pipe w/ occasional white puffs of steam)
All of those have come from personal experience except the head gasket. Also from experience: the absolute worst thing you could do is buy an el cheapo Chinese water hose at a box store and install it with worm gear clamps. Some will tell you that's ok. I will tell you that it is not. I have the photos to prove it. A worm gear is a static clamp that expands and contracts (like all metals) when it heat cycles (no matter how tight you wrench it down). When it expands, it leaks. If not immediately, then soon. Being in constant contact with coolant, the steel hose barb will then start to rust, or if aluminum white aluminum oxide corrosion will form (pitting) as the metal is getting used up in the reaction. In other words, use a reputable hose brand (JAP, USA, or Honda) with a proper OEM spring clamp. Spring clamps maintain constant pressure because as they heat up & expand, so does the spring which causes it to cinch back down to maintain the seal. This is why Honda uses them--think 3 year entire car warranty vs. 30-day part-only warranty from box store. A set of Walmart or Harbor Freight long needle nose pliers make quick work of most spring clamps.

Good luck. Come back and let us know what you found out. Photos of the crime scene would be good too.
 
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