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Build thread looked great until I saw the "welding" pics...omg man...Did he try to mig/stick weld it blind folded??? I agree with the kicking him in the nuts post someone made before...
 

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Bravo. All to familiar. I went from a purple 4dr auto ls to custom blue fully shaved 5 spd turbo with self built bottom end and everything else and get looks and comments every time I take it out. Still not done though always more to do. You did what it takes to make it happen !
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
Had my first dyno. Problems began developing early on. At first, the hose that connects wastegate to MBC melted from sitting to close to the exhaust manifold. I shouldn't have used a silicone hose:



Then the aluminum oil feed flange on the turbo broke when I tried to eliminate what appeared to be a tiny oil leak.





Unfortunately it happened while the car was still running so my hand got sprayed with hot oil:





I'm lucky it didn't get into my eyes. Last but not least, I am only pushing 5psi. The dyno was aborted because the car was smoking. We think its because turbo can't sufficiently drain of the oil.

Remember the adapter that I made earlier to be able to retain the AC? Although it didn't fork for the intended (original) purpose, I found use for it later. By fliping it 180 degrees it allowed me to retain full size radiator by bringing the turbine closer to the engine. However, since it also lowered the turbo, the oil drainage is likely became impaired. So, the adapter has to go. If all goes well, I plan to be back on the dyno tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #48 (Edited)
The car made 337whp. Didn't want to hold boost, otherwise the result would be better. Either way, I'm relearning how to drive it, its insane





It was smoking less. However, tuner said it will get progressively worse and that I need to replace the oil seal on the turbo to eliminate the problem. What a waste of money. I should have gotten myself a Garrett or a Precision from the beginning, too bad I was broke.
 

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Discussion Starter #50 (Edited)
I did it! I finally did it. I didn't tell you, but I kept having this vivid dream as if I'm in the staging lanes. New paint, engine, turbo... As I get close to the water box I begin looking for my helmet but can't find it. So I begin to panic. You know how guys hate when you slow down the lanes. Unable to locate my helmet I suddenly realize that I don't have one. Never had one. Because I never needed it. Because my car is a 16 second car. Then I wake up. Really wake up. Half awake I rush to the garage only to confirm my fears:



No new paint, no turbo, the engine is not even in.

So, I don't think I will be seeing this dream again. Lat night I found my helmet! Last night I ran my first 13-second quarter mile!



 

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Discussion Starter #51 (Edited)
I actually did it on a blown head gasket. Taking a risk? Yes, but I couldn't wait any longer. How did it happen? On my way to the dyno a lower radiator hose came off on the freeway because I forgot to put a clamp on it. Lost the coolant and it overheated.



I'm replacing the head gasket now. Does anyone know what the torqued is for the ARP head studs? My tuner recommends 75 ft-lb.
 

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The Enforcer!
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nice build and write up
did you ever find out why you couldnt hold boost

i know your tuner said to tq those arp studs to 75lb BUT arp says to do it to 80ft lbs
you might want to do what the manufacture suggest...
 

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Discussion Starter #56 (Edited)
Installed an aftermarket water temperature sensor. Perhaps I should be making a new "DIY" thread specific for it instead of posting the details on here:

Parts I used:

1. aftermarket a-pillar gauge holder (optional)
2. gauge
3. temperature sensor
4. hose adapter (advice: purchase one with a 'grounding screw')
5. wires.
6. antifreeze
7. two radiator hose clamps
8. funnel
9. flashlight

Tools I used:

1. appx. 1/16" diameter rod, 16" long (clothes hanger will work)
2. Electrical tape
3. Solder or electrical butt connectors
4. Knife or a saw (to cut through the radiator hose)
5. two ring terminals (for the ground wire)
6. a drill (if using an after market a-pillar gauge holder, to make holes for the wires)
7. bucket to catch the coolant
8. rag (to wipe off spills)
9. screw driver
10.wire splicer
11. zip ties
12. plumbers tape



Step 1: Disconnect the battery.

Step 2: Drain the coolant by removing radiator plug at the bottom of the radiator. Once the coolant begins to drain, remove radiator cap to help it drain quicker.



Step 3: remove upper radiator hose clamps, remove the hose and cut it in half :



Step 4: Install water temperature sensor adapter and secure it with clamps:



Step 5: connect the aftermarket water temperature sensor to the adapter using plumbers tape, re-install the radiator hose.


Step 6: install a ring connecter on one end of a new 5 foot long wire and connect it to the newly installed aftermarket water temperature sensor.








Step 7: run the other end of this wire towards the firewall and secure it with zip ties to the existing wire harness (use common sense). Continue running it along the firewall to the driver side using the same technique.

Step 8: using electrical tape connect the end of this wire to the 1/16" metal rod and gently push it through the firewall (use the center of the existing black rubber grommet). Just don't force it. Insert it only 12 inches or so:



Step 9: go inside and try to locate it under your dash using a flash light. In my opinion this is the most difficult part of this task. You may have to ask for someone to help by shaking the rod from the outside so you could search for it with your hand instead of getting a visual on it. Once you have it in your hand, carefully pull it down and towards you and disconnect 1/16" rod from it (you will need that rod again later).


Note: Steps 10-14 are for the folks who will be using an after market a-pillar gauge holder.


Step 10: place the aftermarket a-pillar over an oem a-pillar to identify the exact height where you want your gauge to be. Using a pencil mark the bottom end of an aftermarket a-pillar on the oem pillar.


Step 11: remove OEM a-pillar cover by pulling the top first. Its clipped and should easily come off.


Step 12: align both a-pillars using the reference line you drew with a pencil. Use electrical tape to secure them together. Now drill two 1/16" holes at the top and at the bottom of the aftermarket a-pillar cover to be used for the screws to be able to later secure an aftermarket a-pillars to the oem a-pillar.


Step 13: drill 1/4" hole through the oem a-pillar so that you could pass the gauge wiring through it. The hole shall be visible through the round gauge opening of the aftermarket a-pillar and shall be big enough to pass 3 wires through it.


Step 14: use 3/8" short screws to secure both a-pillars together. gauge pod to the a-pillar cover.

Step 15: remove ash tray and the two screws behind it (do not remove the center screw) and pull the 9v outlet assembly out.


Step 16: locate 2 wires coming from the bulb that illuminates the ash tray. RED w/black stripe is a negative (ground wire), solid RED is a positive wire. Connect a new 5' long red wire to existing solid red ash tray bulb wire. Then connect new 5-foot long black wire to the existing red w/black stripe ash tray bulb wire. Best is to use a solder. If you don't have one, or don't know how to use one, just use electrical butt connectors and electrical tape.







Step 17: run both new wires behind the dash, above the pedals, towards the a-pillar. Use zip ties to secure new wires to the existing wire harness (use common sense). You don't want new wires to hang low and to accidently step on it while pressing pedals. Once you both ends of new wires reach as far as the fuse box (under the dash) go to the next step.


Step 18: using 1/16" rod, carefully insert it from above where the dash meets the a-pillar. Using the flashlight you should be able to see it, if not, ask someone to shake the rod from above while you search for it with your hand. Once you are able to locate the rod, pull it just enough to be able to secure all 3 wires using electrical tape. Yes connect 3 wires. The third wire is the one you ran through the firewall earlier.


Step 19: pull the 1/16" rod from above to get 3 wires connected to it out. Once the wires are out, disconnect them from the 1/16" rod.


Step 20: run these 3 wires through the oem a-pillar using the 1/4" hole you drilled earlier.



Step 22: install the oem a-pillar cover, bottom first.


Step 23: run the 3 wires from the back of the after market a-pillar through the round gauge opening.


Step 23: attach the aftermarket a-pillar to the oem a-pillar by using 2 screws.


Step 24: connect the wire from the new water temperature sensor to the gauge's green wire. Connect positive ash tray bulb wire to the gauge's red wire. Connect ground ash tray bulb wire to gauge's black wire.




Step 25: install radiator plug and fill-up radiator with 50% antifreeze 50% water. Start the car and bleed coolant as necessary to get all air bubbles out:





Step 26: Enjoy
 

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The Enforcer!
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Thanks man!


As far as the ARP stud torque, you maybe right and I will keep that in mind! Anyone wants to share to what the torque load they applied to their ARP head studs and the end results, please do!
it says it on the instructions inside the box with the ARP head studs. once i find mine ill take a picture and show you if you like
 
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