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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know there are threads talking about turbo builds but I need to know specifically about one aspect of the build. I’m already looking to pretty much have my whole B18b1 motor rebuilt with forged rods and pistons. I see all these options for pistons with a larger bore than the stock 81mm but I really don’t think having my block stripped and sent out to be bored is really within my budget or time right now. I know there are forged pistons that come in stock size with a slight change in compression. My question is are there any serious drawbacks in terms of wear and damage to the rest of the motor if I put together a mild turbo build (no crazy power, maybe 200-250hp to start) with the stock bore? Or is it just as reliable? Assuming I have the proper gaskets, bearings, and head studs of course. Any feedback is appreciated
 

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The benefit of having the block bored is so that you can increase the displacement (more power potential), and also provides ground for achieving an optimum piston ring seal, and eliminates ridges at TDC. Whereas if you don't bore it out, you may find that compression in your chambers may vary. B18 blocks are 18y.o.+. Some have more wear than others. I personally measure cylinder walls for roundness, taper and overall diameter after I hone it. If the measurements are satisfactory (within Honda specs.) then I assemble it w/o any machine work. So, if your budget is tight, I would recommend having it measured to confirm that its still useable. Chances are, you will be ok, unless the short block has very high miles or been sitting in the rain and has deep rust build-up on cylinder walls. Also, for your power goals, you don't have to change the connecting rods. Plenty of guys out there with stock rods, and perhaps even stock pistons are pushing 250whp and I'd say pretty reliably. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
The benefit of having the block bored is so that you can increase the displacement (more power potential), and also provides ground for achieving an optimum piston ring seal, and eliminates ridges at TDC. Whereas if you don't bore it out, you may find that compression in your chambers may vary. B18 blocks are 18y.o.+. Some have more wear than others. I personally measure cylinder walls for roundness, taper and overall diameter after I hone it. If the measurements are satisfactory (within Honda specs.) then I assemble it w/o any machine work. So, if your budget is tight, I would recommend having it measured to confirm that its still useable. Chances are, you will be ok, unless the short block has very high miles or been sitting in the rain and has deep rust build-up on cylinder walls. Also, for your power goals, you don't have to change the connecting rods. Plenty of guys out there with stock rods, and perhaps even stock pistons are pushing 250whp and I'd say pretty reliably. Good luck!
Haha thanks! I just wanna build the engine to take boost the best it can to ensure that it will last me. I also want to prepare it for higher boost in the future. Over time I wanna make it bulletproof and I figured why not start with the internals. So if I were to have the cylinders honed or if the walls seem clean enough, do 81mm pistons sound about right? Or would I need a slightly different size for the piston rings? Keep in mind that’s the stock bore but I don’t know if it’s supposed to fit the bore snug or not
 

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If you hone it, you would still be using 81.00mm pistons and piston rings (assuming the short block hasn't already been bored-out by the previous owner). However, if the measurements are off, you would need to bore it to 81.25mm or 81.50mm, depending on the discrepancy. Lets assume the measurements are within Honda specs. Then you will notice during the assembly that the piston ring gaps will be larger than what the Honda manual calls for. At least that has been my experience. No need for panic. Simply file the top and the second compression rings to make the gaps equal across all four cylinders. New pistons should come with instructions. Per the instruction, the gap sizes will be determined based on the application (track car vs. street etc.). Once you perform the calculation, you will notice that the gaps shall in fact be larger than that of OEM. That is because in forced induction engines, piston ring gaps must be larger to accommodate the extra heat. Otherwise the ends of the rings may collide and break during the operation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just spoke to my mechanic today and I’ve been doing research on parts and what needs to be done. Apparently there is in fact a machine shop that he takes motors to nearby for machining. Honing I believe is something he does himself standard with new builds. I’ve been deciding and putting together a list of parts I will need and I’m getting ready to start ordering them accordingly. I’m gonna start with stock sized forged pistons and forged rods and if the block needs to be bored then so be it. I’ll return the pistons and get new ones unless the cost is within my budget. Luckily my mechanic likes to consistently keep me updated on cost as he goes 😛 Although I was wandering about bearings, head studs, and the whole valve train (valves, seals, springs) if anyone has any recommendations for those and camshafts. I was told forged H beams are good and should give them a try. Any objections? Ultimately, I’m going to build the whole motor. I’m not 100% sure how much power the block itself can take so I’m going to keep the boost on the lower side of maybe 9-12 psi to begin with until I know the block itself can handle it. 250-350 whp is a lot for a car that only weighs about 2300 lbs anyways lol I’ve heard of getting an oil pan fitted for turbo applications? Is that what I’m gonna need? Other than that, I’m putting the part cost together now. Cams, valves, springs, retainers, pistons, rings, rods, bearings, head studs, oil pump?, oil pan?, head gasket, intake manifold, and a hondata hopefully sooner before later. It’s 2:30 am over here so if I’ve missed anything then PLEASE put me on blast and tell me. Planning on making this good so let me know recommendations and suggestions much thanks
 

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Eagle rods is what I use in mine. I use B18B1 short block (w/P72 cylinder head). It made just over 400whp on pump gas and stock sleeves. So I assume 350whp is a realistic goal if you have LS head. As far as oil pan, the turbo will need to constantly drain the oil into something - the oil pan. Hence you would need to drill a hole and weld a fitting to it, so that you could connect your turbo oil drain hose to it. Make sure whoever does the weld knows what he/she is doing. You don't want the oil pan to warp. Other parts you may consider replacing during the engine overhaul:


1. Oil pick-up tube gasket
2. Oil pan gasket
3. Distributor o-ring
4. Valve cover gasket set (including both cam seals)
5. Hoses
6. Thermostat
7. TB gasket
8. Pilot bearing
9. Throw-out bearing
10. Rear main seal
11. Water pump
12. Timing belt and tensioner


I may be missing some things, but it should give you an idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Eagle rods is what I use in mine. I use B18B1 short block (w/P72 cylinder head). It made just over 400whp on pump gas and stock sleeves. So I assume 350whp is a realistic goal if you have LS head. As far as oil pan, the turbo will need to constantly drain the oil into something - the oil pan. Hence you would need to drill a hole and weld a fitting to it, so that you could connect your turbo oil drain hose to it. Make sure whoever does the weld knows what he/she is doing. You don't want the oil pan to warp. Other parts you may consider replacing during the engine overhaul:


1. Oil pick-up tube gasket
2. Oil pan gasket
3. Distributor o-ring
4. Valve cover gasket set (including both cam seals)
5. Hoses
6. Thermostat
7. TB gasket
8. Pilot bearing
9. Throw-out bearing
10. Rear main seal
11. Water pump
12. Timing belt and tensioner


I may be missing some things, but it should give you an idea.
Thank you! Still putting my list together and it’s coming along. A few of those have already been replaced on the motor so I’m half way there lol I was also wandering if anyone knew anything about Nippon turbo pistons?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You are welcome. Nippon turbo pistons are cast iron, not forged. Never had any experience with those, but would personally stay away. The brands I'd consider are CP, JE, SRP, Mahle, Wiseco or Supertech. I'd say do it right the first time - go forged.
I was looking at supertech pistons. These nippons are supposedly rated for 450 hp and I’m only trying to go for about 250-300 so I was intrigued but I don’t wanna test it
 

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You are welcome. Nippon turbo pistons are cast iron, not forged. Never had any experience with those, but would personally stay away. The brands I'd consider are CP, JE, SRP, Mahle, Wiseco or Supertech. I'd say do it right the first time - go forged.
Uh nope. Nippon turbo pistons are not cast IRON..they're cast aluminum. If they were iron, they'd be 20 times heavier and damn near indestructible. :vtec228:
 

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Uh nope. Nippon turbo pistons are not cast IRON..they're cast aluminum. If they were iron, they'd be 20 times heavier and damn near indestructible. :vtec228:
Uh, that's what's up. I feel educated. Nippon pistons are cast aluminum, duh...


Here, I found an interesting quote on Google to put your "educational" statement in perspective.


"Is Cast Iron stronger than aluminum?
Although cast iron has a widely held reputation of being stronger than cast aluminum, this is not necessarily the case. Most aluminum alloys have a higher tensile strength. Aluminum can also resist impact better than iron, which is notoriously brittle."
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That’s pretty interesting actually. I still think I wanna side with forged pistons for the sake of investment and reliability. Although aluminum pistons do sound pretty good considering I’m not running over 300…to start
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I had a thought regarding the turbo build. I’m looking into camshafts right now and I have people telling me to drop the new cams in while I have the motor open and I have people telling me to wait and pick my cams when I’m ready to I install my turbo. I even know mechanics who are telling me to install the cams now while I have it open. My question is can stage 2 turbo cams run efficiently on a NA setup before the turbo? Found only one person talk about this in one post and they said it would be fine. Just wanted the opinion of others. Not looking to add power while NA, but I just wanna know, would it be alright?
 

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If you plan to run bigger cams without going to a dyno, you will not damage anything, but will lose power. Of course, it makes sense to put the cams in while the engine is open to save the time later.


By the way, I run OEM GSR cams in mine and never considered replacing them. Still made good power.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you plan to run bigger cams without going to a dyno, you will not damage anything, but will lose power. Of course, it makes sense to put the cams in while the engine is open to save the time later.


By the way, I run OEM GSR cams in mine and never considered replacing them. Still made good power.
I wish those were an option for me. I’m running non-vtec lol I’m gonna try to go for a mild cam anyways so driveability should be just fine. Also, will I lose power? Or will it just be moved higher in the powerband?
 

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Your idling would be rougher.. While the powerband would move up the RPM range with a proper adjustment of timing and fuel, w/o tuning you will likely experience a loss of power across the board after increasing the cam duration. But since your going with a stage 2 cam, the loss shall be minimal as compared to more aggressive camshafts.
 

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Yes might as well get cams and put them in. I run Crower 404 with Rocket Motorsports valve springs. Also running a Victor X intake manifold. My car is an LS-Turbo as well.

Have you made any decisions on injectors, fuel pump, going E85?

For putting the cams while the engine is out is to easily degree the cams for best results. They can adjust it accordingly. I’m running aggressive cams and it idles like a muscle car sometimes. Lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Your idling would be rougher.. While the powerband would move up the RPM range with a proper adjustment of timing and fuel, w/o tuning you will likely experience a loss of power across the board after increasing the cam duration. But since your going with a stage 2 cam, the loss shall be minimal as compared to more aggressive camshafts.
As much as I don’t like the sound of “loss of power” I can suck it up as long as it’s not hurting the engine. I know these B-series can take a lot especially if built lol rough idle as what though? If it’s just choppy and loud then I can handle that. Not much different than my straight piped GT
 
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