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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, lowered my car 2 weeks ago about 1.5" drop on stock wheels with 205/50/15 tires. Recently purchased 17" wheels with 205/40/17 tires. This has raised my car up about 1/4 inch, which has minimized my camber to a degree (no pun intended!) My alignment after the lowering was 1.2 deg. negative camber front, 1.5 deg. negative camber rear. Toe was zero front, 1/16 inches in rear. I am getting one of my wheel bearings replaced (as it is howling/grinding) and considering getting an alignment done. Now I know the toe readings are within spec, but since the wheel/tire upgrade, I know it has changed. My question is: What specs should I go with for toe? I'm thinking maybe a slight toe out in front, and very little toe in at rear.?
Anyone have any suggestions or previous expieriences?
I want crisp, sharp turn-in and response, but dont want to fry my tires in one year. Compromise is good here.

Thanks, all! And I must say I am very impressed with the wealth of information this team offers. From what I've read, there are quite a few knowledgeable and educated people(MichaelDelaney comes to mind) and I hope I can share some of my knowledge as well. This is my first import car and I can guarantee you all that I will never go back to a domestic car(unless someone gave me their ZO-6 Corvette)
 

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Zero toe is the best for tire wear.
Mabey I'm not understanding...changing the wheels wont effect your alignment at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The 17" tires are taller than the 15" therefore raising the vehicle therefore changing camber & toe.
 

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It doesn't work that way. Your not moving anything on the car itself. Think of the toe and camber as lines. They go in one direction as far as you want. so getting a bigger wheel/tire will not effect them.
 

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you should consider getting a full camber kit and then getting your alignment done. camber kits are usually the best way to save tire life on lowered cars, not to mention precise handling.
 

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Well, changing from 15's with 50 series tires to 17's with 40 series means your sidewall has gotten smaller. Therefore your overall diameter (wheel and tire) hasn't changed a lot. There shouldn't be an incredible difference with the alighnment specs now, but then again I havn't done any math as to the actual difference in diameter (I actually think it's called aspect ratio, but correct me if I'm wrong), so I may be off.
 

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Grendel on Mar/23/04 said:
Well, changing from 15's with 50 series tires to 17's with 40 series means your sidewall has gotten smaller. Therefore your overall diameter (wheel and tire) hasn't changed a lot. There shouldn't be an incredible difference with the alighnment specs now, but then again I havn't done any math as to the actual difference in diameter (I actually think it's called aspect ratio, but correct me if I'm wrong), so I may be off.
Wheel size WILL NOT affect alignment. . notice two periods, that means I'm really really right. You're thinking of negative camber from lowering. You dont lower with tires, you lower with modified suspension. The key difference there, something bolted to hub, vs what the hubs bolted to.

period
 

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Why do you want toe out in front? If you were in a track situation, you *might* want mild toe in for the front, and toe out in the rear, but that would depend on the rest of the suspension.

I say keep the toe neutral, maybe a slight rear toe out if you want the car to rotate easier, keep camber less than 2 degrees, and if you are dead set on a sharp turn in, swap the front upper control arms to the opposite side.
 

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some mild Toe out in front can increase overall cornering force. Since tires have the highest grip at specific slip angle, playing with toe out can alter the slip angle of the tire and *hopefully* put it in a better range for maximum traction.

I am running 1/8th total toe out in front (1/16th per side).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
on a RWD car, you would typically see toe in since the rear wheels are driving the car. In this case, the front wheels would have a natural tendency to toe out (assuming the wheels were set at zero). on a FWD car, you would typically see toe out since the front wheels are being driven, and would have a natural tendency to toe in. With my old car, (Dodge Omni 2.2L HO 5sp) I found that toe out really helped out my cornering at the expense of tire wear. I just want to find a happy medium. Also, does anyone think that adjusting my toe will cure some of my slight tracking problem? Even a little? It doesn't track too bad, though. Worse with the 17's compared to the 15's.
 

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Toe will make it worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
in or out?
 

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Any.
 

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on a RWD car, you would typically see toe in since the rear wheels are driving the car. In this case, the front wheels would have a natural tendency to toe out (assuming the wheels were set at zero). on a FWD car, you would typically see toe out since the front wheels are being driven, and would have a natural tendency to toe in.
This is true. But just want to make it clear this is under acceleration. on a rwd car the drive tires tend to want to pull outwards. on a FWD car, where the front tires are pulling the car instead of pushing (like in RWD), the tires tend to pull inward. Thus running some toe-out will correct this.
 
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