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This website is essential for anyone who owns and loves their teg. A lot of great minds are on this site and our knowledge isn't written down in some manual with no extra answers. Keep up the good work every one and show every damn Probe, Cavalier, and especially those stoopid neons your tailights at every stoplight minus the cops. If you do nothing else to your teg, please, advance your timing. It'll do wonders!
 

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how do u advance timing and is there any risk of damage, warranty, gas efficiency etc etc
 

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there's a how-to on this site for ignition timing advancing/retarding.

as for risks... i see none, unless you advance it like way into the 20's BTDC. All i got from it was better gas mileage, which was good enough for me.
 

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do you really get better gas mileage?

anyhow, it wouldn't make up the price for premium gas. unless you're the type that puts in premium gas because you think it will actually burn cleaner or make you go faster... (this is for the b18b's who need 87 btw).
 

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i did notice better gas mileage. Before, i was getting nowhere near the manufacturer-claimed 25-30mpg. Now, i get at least 27mpg every gas tank (which i find pretty good compared to before)
 

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ok, i have a question, may seem stupid. I tried to, but i turned off my car, turned distributor, bolts won't line up. And it didn't do anything. Do i turn it while it is running? Do i just turn it and then line it up again and screw it back in without taking it out of the engine? The article was not clear on that part.
 

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I always thought you couldn't advanced the timing on any 2000-up Integras also because of the newer OBDII version.

You turn it while it's running. Don't forget to jump the service connector.
 

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make sure you use a timing gun when your doing this. You don't wanna just randomly turn your distributor, cuz you'll end up seriously f*ckin up your engine.
 

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I have a 2001 and advancing my timing to 18 degrees BTDC from 16 still gave me better gas mileage. I'm not sure at what point the ECU decides to pull back the timing from base but there's no mistaking I consistantly have gotten 2-3mpg better at 18 degrees than I did at 16 degrees.
 

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That's cool. I couldn't see myself getting any better though with a consistent 30mpg, but if anyone around here has a timing gun, I'm at least going to try a tank with the advancement.
 

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SurferX on Aug/13/02 said:
I have a 2001 and advancing my timing to 18 degrees BTDC from 16 still gave me better gas mileage. I'm not sure at what point the ECU decides to pull back the timing from base but there's no mistaking I consistantly have gotten 2-3mpg better at 18 degrees than I did at 16 degrees.
i thought you couldnt adjust a 2001's timing period?
 

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advancing timing is a good ways to get quick hp but it can also be damaging to yur egeine because too much advance can have denotaion which is very bad.
 

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infinit113 on Mar/03/05 said:
advancing timing is a good ways to get quick hp but it can also be damaging to yur egeine because too much advance can have denotaion which is very bad.


uhhhhh..and you are resurrecting an old basic thread to make a point that everyone knows about already because.....????

not only is there an article about how to reset your baseline timing at the distributor rotor, there is also an explanation of the "negative work" that you make the piston do, as it's squeezing the air fuel mix on the compression stroke when you advance too much baseline...and there's a basic ignition timing map/table ECU reprogramming discussion in the ECU basics article.

Here is an ignition table if you've never seen one showing the indicators of engine load or inputs : Manifold Pressure (which measures air flow delivery) and rpm and the amount of programmed timing advance above what you set at the distibutor at each rpm. Notice that they can add as much as 12-20 degrees more advance on top of what you set at your distributor in the upper rpms and if the air flow is high. :



WHAT IS MEANT BY NEGATIVE WORK FOR THE PISToN WHEN I ADVANCE THE BASE TIMING ?





when you start the igniting of the mix earlier, you cause the combustion process to work against the piston earlier.

Notice that the baseline ignition timing at your distributor is in units of crankshaft degrees Before Top Dead Center (BTDC) or before the piston reaches the very top of its travel on the compression stroke.

So the earlier you ignite the mix, the earlier the mix expands. As the mix expands (combustion is an expanding process and pushes a force outwards against the piston top), the piston is STILL PUSHING UP on the compression stroke. When you ADVANCE, you make the time for pushing or squeezing against the expanding gas LoNGER. The piston loses energy by trying to work against this expanding combustion, BEFORE the piston starts on it's downward travel to turn the crank on the power stroke which is what makes hp. That's why advancing is called "NEGATIVE WORK" for the piston.

Advance "just enough". Don't advance too far. You can get too much. Advance too far and you generate more pressure. More pressure inside a closed container, like a cylinder, means more heat. Higher heat causes the mix to burn too fast and that is, by definition, detonation.

I usually recommend to people not to advance past the recommended stock maximum of 18 degrees BTDC. Some people do 19-20 BTDC but the gains compared to the added wear from negative work is NOT worth it. You can get more gains from using other tuning strategies like playing with the advance on your ECU ignition tables in the last 3000 rpm near redline. Try to use the lowest baseline advance that you can get away with and reduce the "negative work" your piston has to do.

So, we not only can redo the advance statically with the distibutor for the baseline ignition timing, we also can reprogram the change in advance from that baseline at each rpm on the ECU's ignition tables.

Ignition timing ECU reprogramming is very very important for performance actually. It really does make it or break it when you do part throttle tuning and removes the bogginess and flatspots of responsiveness at part throttle.


We've come a long way in knowledge around here since 2002. You may want to catch up by reading the articles first.
 

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mcnab on Mar/03/05 said:
u tell em MD


Well, I had to do it. I'm NOT trying to be mean or anything. Sorry....but...


It's like being a tourist and obliviously coming on here and announcing to everyone who's a local that they need to get a cold air intake because it draws in colder air and that is good....you get the analogy, right?


It sort of ignores the wisdom that's already here , wisdom that everyone can have access to , and wisdom that they can learn about and increase/progress their knowledge from...and it's all from threads ad articles by regular grassroots enthusiasts like you and me...

Take a look around you first and familiarize yourself with this place and it' guidelines, before you post.

We're not like another honda site.

Welcome to TI.net.


If you have any questions about the info that you don't understand or have new info,then, please post.

I think people here want to help and discuss NEW topics or clarify the meaning of old controversial topics, or clarify misunderstandings.

I don't think the members here want to "hit the reset button" or "re-invent the wheel", if we have thoroughly reviewed some ideas and facts that are now only being restated again.
 
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