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1997 Integra LS
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys

I'm getting ready to change out the bushings for my 97 Integra LS, and I've read the (horror) threads about the rear LCA bolts breaking so am planning to get new LCA bolts just in case.
I've followed the suggestions to PB Blast all the bolts so hopefully won't have bolts break off on me...

Even if none of the bolts break, would it be worthwhile to replace all of the other main bolts for the control arms while I'm at it?
I came up with this list below, would appreciate if someone could let me know if I'm missing any important ones or if some aren't going to be worthwhile to replace.

90172-SK7-A01 Bolt, Shock Absorber (LOWER) (10X84) x 2
90173-SR3-003 Bolt, Arm (LOWER) (10X80) x 4
90118-SR3-003 Bolt, Self-Lock (12X76) x 2
90120-SB0-003 Bolt, Shock Absorber Lock (10X42) x 2
90175-SH3-005 Bolt, Shock Absorber Fork x 2

BTW, I've been lurking around the forum for some time but just recently got into modifying our Integra (first owner since 1997, less than 103k miles).
The stock shocks have just gone bad so first thing will be doing is replacing them with some TEIN coilovers in addition to the bushings.
I know the OEM bolts are gonna cost me over $100, but we're planning to keep the car for however long we can, even if it means doing an engine swap, etc.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Bolts only really break if rusted solid. If a bolt breaks loose OK there is no reason to replace them. Honda uses great hardware, I would spend my money elsewhere.

If your car is rusty, I'd recommend loosening with an electric impact driver. If the threads come out rusty, clean them up on a wire wheel.
 

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1997 Integra LS
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9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you @Whitney ! I just called my local Acura dealer to ask if they have these bolts in stock in case I need to get one replaced. Was thinking it would be cheaper to buy all the bolts online but I guess I'll save the money and spend it on control arms instead.

BTW, I've seen some good reviews with Hardrace bushings, but are their control arms worth getting as well? I can't seem to find any Function 7s anymore online.
 

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LCA bolts aren’t too common to break, the UCA’s and compensator arms are a different story. I’ve just replaced all my stock bushings with polyurethane and the rear LCA’s gave me no problem at all. The rear Uppers and compensator arms I had to cut 3 out of the 6 bolts bc they had seized inside the bushing sleeves. You should be in good shape, factory bolts are expensive as hell from the dealer, I managed to get my replacement bolts from a local junkyard for free
 

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1997 Integra LS
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Discussion Starter #5
LCA bolts aren’t too common to break, the UCA’s and compensator arms are a different story. I’ve just replaced all my stock bushings with polyurethane and the rear LCA’s gave me no problem at all. The rear Uppers and compensator arms I had to cut 3 out of the 6 bolts bc they had seized inside the bushing sleeves. You should be in good shape, factory bolts are expensive as hell from the dealer, I managed to get my replacement bolts from a local junkyard for free
Wow, thanks @Kevin311 that's good to know. I'll make sure to PB Blast all those UCA and compensator bolts as well before trying to take them out.
Somehow I've heard quite a few instances where the LCA bolt broke off or got seized and had to be cut off, but I'll see if I get lucky...
 

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I'm sure this problem was resolved a few months ago, but just stumbled upon it so I figured I'd throw in my 2c...

Some of my methods for stuck/ seized/ rusted/ corroded bolts:
  • Before really going down the rabbit hole, try a breaker bar with a few love taps from your favorite hammer. Please don't use cheaters or beaters on your socket wrench.
  • If that doesn't work, try your impact gun (or hand impact & baby sledge if you have one of those). Before hammering away at it, be sure of whether it's normal threads or left-hand threads (e.g. PS Pulley--yes, I learned that the hard way)
  • Apply penetrating oil (e.g. PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, CRC, or WD-40) and wait for 15 min and try again.
  • If P/O doesn't work add heat. Start small by applying heat from a heat gun, once gutten hot, apply more penetrating oil, try the impact again.
  • If all else fails, check for flammable or meltable objects nearby (either protect them or sacrifice them to the car gods) and go to town with your propane or MAP torch. I had to remove the awful allen bolt on the A/C belt tensioner, but only after an hour of beating, spraying, heating, cussing, and then reluctantly torching it to 350 degF, did it finally zip out with the allen socket in my impact gun and fell on the ground smoking. Come to think of it...everything was smoking. The grease in the old bearing was probably on fire. I was done with it so I went in and got a beer and let it put itself out.
If none of the above "non-destructive" techniques worked for you, you're probably already having a bad day & it's about to get worse. Sorry. Get your angle grinder, reciprocating saw, or drill with cobalt bits and destroy the fastener. After cutting or drilling, hammer it out if you can or use a Screw-Out / Bolt-Out kit to remove the remains if you can't. Keep your saw blade or drill bit cooled in oil or water and don't force it.

If it's not a bolt, but a instead a stuck stud, I've had amazing success using some PBB & a cam-action stud remover that spun them out with a 3/8" socket wrench.

After I replaced my dry-rotted stock bushings with Energy polys, I cleaned and cleaned the bolts & used Sil-Glyde on the moving bits & antiseize on the threads...don't mix them. Axle grease is petroleum-based and destroys polyurethane so stick with silicone. Or skip the grease entirely and enjoy the squeak.
 
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