Running Log: jjkz24's JDM Front GSR / 770whp @31psi - Page 79 - Team Integra Forums - Team Integra
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post #1093 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-05-2015, 10:56 AM
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I'm going to come across as a killjoy here, but it's my engineer brain running nonstop and some nasty personal experiences that are driving it.

I'm assuming the fat red and black cables tucked back by the wheel well are the battery cables. They should be protected, as should the battery.

Honda puts the battery in the back corner of the engine bay partially because it's a very survivable location (it's also easy to access, and close to the starter). The odds that area will be destroyed in a wreck are small (that corner is the junction of 4 frame members, more or less), and the odds the battery will short and/or explode are smaller.

Putting a battery in the trunk does a similar thing. It's in a more deformable crumple zone, but placed in the spare well or near a shock tower it's highly survivable, and poses similar short and explosion risk.

Putting the battery behind the bumper is, IMO, stupid. It's an area that sees high vibration due to it's relative distance from the CG of the car. Batteries don't like to be shaken, even the 'special' ones. It places it in a hugely risky position. Catch a high curb? Battery shorts to the frame. Tap a catch barrier? Battery shorts to the frame, or splits open. Catch the corner of another car? Battery shorts to the frame, or splits open.

Do me at least one favor, ok? Put a properly sized fuse as close to the positive terminal as you can. Like really close. Maybe bolted to the positive terminal. Then make sure the battery top is covered by a doubled layer of 1/8" rubber, to mitigate contact with the steel above it. I've seen batteries go. Two of them have sent me to the hospital. One exploded and burned me, through my cotton clothes. One shorted and vented sulfuric acid into the air thick enough I had some chemical burns in my lungs. Neither one was subject to the violence imparted in an accident, or the additional risks that are carried by such a location as yours.

As an electrical engineer, batteries don't scare me. Neither does AC power. Or high voltage. Or high power RF (think of your microwave). That doesn't mean I'm not wary of the dangers. A battery, whether it be lead-acid, lithium, or some other novel chemistry not used in automotive applications, is a very small step away from being a bomb. Care and feeding is what keeps it happy, and not explody. Lithium needs even more care. They don't fail happily at high temperature like lead-acid batteries (kinda) do. And if you puncture one, instead of leaking like lead-acid (usually does), they have a habit of causing very hot, very nasty fires (and that's just a phone battery).

If you want any more support for my position, look at the rules for sanctioning bodies in professional motorsports. None of them put a battery in a crash zone like that.
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post #1094 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-05-2015, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpaton View Post
I'm going to come across as a killjoy here, but it's my engineer brain running nonstop and some nasty personal experiences that are driving it.

I'm assuming the fat red and black cables tucked back by the wheel well are the battery cables. They should be protected, as should the battery.

Honda puts the battery in the back corner of the engine bay partially because it's a very survivable location (it's also easy to access, and close to the starter). The odds that area will be destroyed in a wreck are small (that corner is the junction of 4 frame members, more or less), and the odds the battery will short and/or explode are smaller.

Putting a battery in the trunk does a similar thing. It's in a more deformable crumple zone, but placed in the spare well or near a shock tower it's highly survivable, and poses similar short and explosion risk.

Putting the battery behind the bumper is, IMO, stupid. It's an area that sees high vibration due to it's relative distance from the CG of the car. Batteries don't like to be shaken, even the 'special' ones. It places it in a hugely risky position. Catch a high curb? Battery shorts to the frame. Tap a catch barrier? Battery shorts to the frame, or splits open. Catch the corner of another car? Battery shorts to the frame, or splits open.

Do me at least one favor, ok? Put a properly sized fuse as close to the positive terminal as you can. Like really close. Maybe bolted to the positive terminal. Then make sure the battery top is covered by a doubled layer of 1/8" rubber, to mitigate contact with the steel above it. I've seen batteries go. Two of them have sent me to the hospital. One exploded and burned me, through my cotton clothes. One shorted and vented sulfuric acid into the air thick enough I had some chemical burns in my lungs. Neither one was subject to the violence imparted in an accident, or the additional risks that are carried by such a location as yours.

As an electrical engineer, batteries don't scare me. Neither does AC power. Or high voltage. Or high power RF (think of your microwave). That doesn't mean I'm not wary of the dangers. A battery, whether it be lead-acid, lithium, or some other novel chemistry not used in automotive applications, is a very small step away from being a bomb. Care and feeding is what keeps it happy, and not explody. Lithium needs even more care. They don't fail happily at high temperature like lead-acid batteries (kinda) do. And if you puncture one, instead of leaking like lead-acid (usually does), they have a habit of causing very hot, very nasty fires (and that's just a phone battery).

If you want any more support for my position, look at the rules for sanctioning bodies in professional motorsports. None of them put a battery in a crash zone like that.
Those are all very great points that you stated, and most of them have already been taken into consideration. Where I failed in my prior post was a detailed explanation on what specifically is being done with the battery as precautions.

Before I do, let me reiterate that this vehicle sees very little mileage in a given calendar year. In 2014, the vehicle saw 10 miles total. In 2013, 412 miles were put on the odometer, and 2012 saw 318. The purpose of the vehicle has always been a "weekend" or "sunny day" vehicle, where excessive road time is null, along with being a show vehicle. Not that accidents can't happen during those times, but the overall chance of an accident occurring (IMO) is slim to none.

This year, there will be one racing event in October, in which I'll be attending. It's held twice per year, but I've already missed the scheduled event this past July. I don't anticipate any accidents or failures (not to say that they can't happen), but I feel that the battery placement currently will be suffice, overall.

Precautions so far, will include rubber boots on both the positive & negative battery terminals, as well as a 200 amp fuse on the positive terminal. My goal is to have it bolted directly to the terminal (as you suggested), but it will be dependent on which direction the cables will be routed. As long as room allows, I don't see why it can't be bolted to my battery terminal clamp.

As much as I know that there are better locations suited for my battery, I stop and think about my 1990 Ford Ranger, and my 1991 Honda Accord that have the battery directly behind the passenger headlight. I realize that the battery is above the front bumper supports in these vehicles (where mine is below the support), I can't help but think that no matter what accident is involved, the battery in any of these vehicles would take a great hit, no matter how many precautions are applied. Even if the battery was installed in the trunk, a side impact would more than likely, shred the 10-12ft cable, and the same result would occur.

In any case accidents can occur at anytime, and I hopefully never have to find out if this idea is a good one, or not.





770whp/500wtq @31psi E85


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post #1095 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
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Wiring Harness:

Some additional items have been addressed. First, is the Coil On Pack - Hondata harness. This was pulled through the firewall.





This harness was created for the additional sensors. Wires for the boost solenoid (not shown), flex-fuel sensor, and fuel pressure were run, along with appropriate connectors. All of which can be datalogged.


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post #1096 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
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Fuel Pumps:

As you may have recalled, I purchased this beauty from Full-Blown. It houses twin 340lph fuel pumps:





It finally got installed last week. These are not fun to install.



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post #1097 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 08:51 AM Thread Starter
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Update:

Cylinder head is currently at the 1st of two machine shops. The first will be o-ringing around the combustion chambers, and the 2nd machine shop will be re-seating, and installing the BC valves.

How the car currently sits:














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post #1098 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 11:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpaton View Post
I'm going to come across as a killjoy here, but it's my engineer brain running nonstop and some nasty personal experiences that are driving it.

I'm assuming the fat red and black cables tucked back by the wheel well are the battery cables. They should be protected, as should the battery.

Honda puts the battery in the back corner of the engine bay partially because it's a very survivable location (it's also easy to access, and close to the starter). The odds that area will be destroyed in a wreck are small (that corner is the junction of 4 frame members, more or less), and the odds the battery will short and/or explode are smaller.

Putting a battery in the trunk does a similar thing. It's in a more deformable crumple zone, but placed in the spare well or near a shock tower it's highly survivable, and poses similar short and explosion risk.

Putting the battery behind the bumper is, IMO, stupid. It's an area that sees high vibration due to it's relative distance from the CG of the car. Batteries don't like to be shaken, even the 'special' ones. It places it in a hugely risky position. Catch a high curb? Battery shorts to the frame. Tap a catch barrier? Battery shorts to the frame, or splits open. Catch the corner of another car? Battery shorts to the frame, or splits open.

Do me at least one favor, ok? Put a properly sized fuse as close to the positive terminal as you can. Like really close. Maybe bolted to the positive terminal. Then make sure the battery top is covered by a doubled layer of 1/8" rubber, to mitigate contact with the steel above it. I've seen batteries go. Two of them have sent me to the hospital. One exploded and burned me, through my cotton clothes. One shorted and vented sulfuric acid into the air thick enough I had some chemical burns in my lungs. Neither one was subject to the violence imparted in an accident, or the additional risks that are carried by such a location as yours.

As an electrical engineer, batteries don't scare me. Neither does AC power. Or high voltage. Or high power RF (think of your microwave). That doesn't mean I'm not wary of the dangers. A battery, whether it be lead-acid, lithium, or some other novel chemistry not used in automotive applications, is a very small step away from being a bomb. Care and feeding is what keeps it happy, and not explody. Lithium needs even more care. They don't fail happily at high temperature like lead-acid batteries (kinda) do. And if you puncture one, instead of leaking like lead-acid (usually does), they have a habit of causing very hot, very nasty fires (and that's just a phone battery). very hot, very nasty fires

If you want any more support for my position, look at the rules for sanctioning bodies in professional motorsports. None of them put a battery in a crash zone like that.
I have to totally disagree with this sentiment - it keeps the battery cooler which increases longevity, and it lowers the CG of the entire car by moving 30 lbs down a foot or more. Honda hasn't always put their batteries by the passenger firewall either, the 4th gen civic / 2nd gen CRX puts it right behing the radiator, right in harm's way in a front end collision. Chrysler used that very position for all of their "cloud cars", which passed the scrutineering of the NHTSA.



also, to make a lead-acid battery explode takes some serious mishandling versus extremely touchy lithium chemistry. (SLA takes overcharging at 14.8+v for extended periods to evolve enough hydrogen, with the flame arrestors/vents forcefully plugged so they can't relieve the pressure buildup, while the battery is also internally shorted to create an ignition source), even then the end result just ruptures the case and makes a loud noise

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post #1099 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
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Turbo:

Got the turbo back today. I had a 6-blade split billet wheel installed, and had it balanced. This compressor wheel looks like a piece of art.

Before I sent it out:









And what it looks like now with the new wheel:





Taking this to the shop, probably tomorrow. Thinking about shooting the compressor housing with silver Duplicolor, the same paint as I used on the engine block.
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post #1100 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 08:42 PM Thread Starter
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Headlights:

This is purely astetic purposed, as I'm a perfectionist. My OCD was going nuts with the haze that I just can't get out of my old, non-HID headlight assessmblies. Even wet-sanding down to a 600 grit, then 800, 1000, 1200, and finished with a plasitic polish couldn't get them clear enough for me. These took me awhile to locate, namely because I was being picky. Finally found a set being sold in Tokyo. Ordered them last Thursday, and came through customs yesterday, and I pick them up at the post-office tomorrow on my lunch break. These are the HID, 98-spec assemblies. I had a decent HID kit in my old assemblies, but this will have the OEM light cut-off that I'm looking for.

Anyways, here are the old:





And here are the new:




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post #1101 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 09:13 PM
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Turbo looks awesome!

I think youll need the flame proof paint for the turbo. Im sure the normal engine enamel wont last long on a turbo. I would personally go with a black but thats just me.
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post #1102 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Turbo looks awesome!

I think youll need the flame proof paint for the turbo. Im sure the normal engine enamel wont last long on a turbo. I would personally go with a black but thats just me.
I have the hot side ceramic coated in black, and thought that maybe it'd be too much black. I've been tossing the idea of doing something different as well. I've had this idea of copper plating the compressor housing, along with the valve cover, with black lettering. I don't see copper motifs used too much.
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post #1103 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-12-2015, 11:24 PM
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Nice headlights. Those looks so much crispier.
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post #1104 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 02:03 PM Thread Starter
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Cylinder Head:

First of two machine shops complete. Now it's off to get o-ringed:


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post #1105 of 1269 (permalink) Old 08-14-2015, 03:39 PM
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Hmm. I'm assuming the next trip will clean up that surface after the o-ringing? It looks WAY too rough IMO.
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post #1106 of 1269 (permalink) Old 09-10-2015, 09:53 PM Thread Starter
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Between vacations, and beach trips, I haven't had much time to update...so I apologize on the lacking updates.
@dpaton - The machine shop that followed only did the o-ringing, and although the picture above doesn't display the work of the 1st shop, the surface is indeed really smooth. I agree with you, that the picture above doesn't show it well.

Got the new headlights in. And, although the lenses are clear and perfect, the rest of the housings needed some much TLC. Here are some pics showing the grease, rust, and overall condition of the headlights:











As you can see, these were harsh to look at when I got them. Again, the lenses were clear, non-cloudy or hazed, and in perfect condition. The rest of the light needed some love, however.

So, lets do something about that, shall we?

First, I completely dismantled the headlight housing, pulling the internal wiring harness out, and dismantling the attached ballast, and all brackets. Then, I degreased as much as I could, and taped off everything but the back of the lens:







I found that the perfect matched paint for the back of the housing, is standard grey primer. And that's exactly what I used to spray the back of these (I unfortunately didn't get a picture showing the paint after spraying, instead, I have pics of the finished product).

I then purchased new Honda OEM warning labels (2) that typically are attached to the top of the HID ballast bracket. Ordered these from ICBMotorsport.com




Dismantling the wire harness proved to be a pain, but wanted these to be in "like new" condition.

I sprayed all brackets with 4 coats of a base black, attached the labels, and sprayed 5 coats of clear over the brackets and labels. I wanted these to be protected, and not peel from engine bay heat.

Here's the final product. I think both headlights turned out great.








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